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hypothetical implications of storage warp

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Posted on November 21, 2022 at 11:54:52
Chuck
Audiophile

Posts: 793
Joined: August 22, 2000
We've all seen a record warped by storage. It is the result of prolonged storage while bent slightly, but usually without any heat. So, I wonder: could one flatten a mildly warped record just with weight and time? If so, how long would it take to make a difference? Has anyone tried it?

 

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RE: hypothetical implications of storage warp, posted on November 21, 2022 at 13:16:37
Horatio Alger
Audiophile

Posts: 26
Joined: June 4, 2021
Yes. Someone posted here before about flattening out a warp by just storing the record in a tight place for a long time. Don't know if it was horizontal or vertical. Was it Beach Cruiser who posted that? Don't want to speak for you, Beach Cruiser.

 

This has been discussed a long time ago, but it required being in the , posted on November 21, 2022 at 18:31:33
alaskahiatt
Audiophile

Posts: 6772
Joined: December 9, 2000
Contributor
  Since:
November 1, 2005
not too hot sun for an extended time. The old post said this method did succeed. I just did an archive search using "warp + sun," and there were lots of posts about placing an LP between glass in the sun for an extended period.

I tried it for a very long time in a garage and between two plates of glass. I even added some type of weight, but the warp never went away. It was over a year before I examined the record.

 

yeah it was me, posted on November 21, 2022 at 23:12:54
beach cruiser
Audiophile

Posts: 6225
Location: so cal
Joined: September 24, 2003
I had a record that I bought used that had a ski jump warp on the first song of the record, it would literally fling the cartridge out of contact with the record surface.

It had a nice song about food on the album, so I kept it, and played it occasionally , omitting the first cut. ( album from a band called,"pure food and drug act" if memory serves)

my desire to own records conflicted with available storage space and sanity, so they are really jammed in there, in a vertical storage.

After an indeterminate amount of time, I was surprised that the record had returned to its original , as pressed , form- no warp. I live in a moderate climate so nothing above room temperature was involved.

Things are so tight, my latest stratigy is to remove the storage cover from every other album, because that much plastic takes up room that might hold another record, while still preventing ring wear.

It not like I have a valuable curated with skill collection, just like to keep things nice.

 

RE: This has been discussed a long time ago, but it required being in the , posted on November 23, 2022 at 11:21:29
beach cruiser
Audiophile

Posts: 6225
Location: so cal
Joined: September 24, 2003
I too have often read of using sunlight and two pains of window glass, but I certainly would only do this very carefully.

In a paper by the cartridge designer Van den hul , he suggested using butcher paper between the glass and the record, and I think this make sense, permitting some ease of movement between the glass heat source and the vinyl. Of course, his remarks were made at a time before butcher paper became plastic coated on one side to prevent liquid intrusion, so I would probably just grab some plain paper inner sleeve material for the boundary layer.

 

RE: hypothetical implications of storage warp, posted on November 23, 2022 at 13:09:06
flood2
Audiophile

Posts: 2413
Joined: January 11, 2011
Just buy a VinylFlat and Groovy Pouch - much more reliable. Warped records are almost a given either in production or distribution. Even the Tone Poets I bought recently needed flattening.
Regards Anthony

"Beauty is Truth, Truth Beauty.." Keats

 

Ah, clever idea. Nt, posted on November 23, 2022 at 22:05:36
alaskahiatt
Audiophile

Posts: 6772
Joined: December 9, 2000
Contributor
  Since:
November 1, 2005
nt

 

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