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For the day that's in it...

24.23.167.145

Posted on March 17, 2017 at 21:24:29
B.K.
Audiophile

Posts: 883
Location: Ireland
Joined: February 18, 2007



For the day that's in it...

Before Beyonce, the Rolling stones or the Beatles; before Elvis, Sinatra or Crosby; there was John McCormack the pop star and musical favorite of our Grandparents' generation. During World War I, his recording of "Keep the Home Fires Burning" sold in the millions and his name spread through the printed media in a manner similar to celebrity tweets. Of course, his records were different to the downloads of today, or even the 45s of yesterday, but the 78s of the 1910s - which were single sided like the one in the picture - were the one-century-ago equivalent of today's 'tracks'.

"I see thy face in every dream,
My waking thoughts are full of thee
Thy glance is in the starry beam
That falls along the summer sea."

Link to sound below.

 

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While I am not a big John McCormack fan, I still appreciate your post., posted on March 17, 2017 at 23:53:56
alaskahiatt
Audiophile

Posts: 3719
Joined: December 9, 2000
Contributor
  Since:
November 1, 2005
I actually have some of his one sided discs, and I have noticed that a lot of vocalists(not all) in the early 1900s wanted to sing in the operatic style. Of course the pop Billy Murrays of the day went too far the other way.

What a beautiful base for that beautiful Garrard. Is that bamboo veneer?

 

RE: While I am not a big John McCormack fan, I still appreciate your post., posted on March 18, 2017 at 10:02:58
B.K.
Audiophile

Posts: 883
Location: Ireland
Joined: February 18, 2007
Thanks.

Well McCormack started off singing opera in Italy, and then at Covent Garden, before becoming a recording artist and concert performer. So I guess that's where the style came from.

The accent is never completely missing from his performances - but I guess he was like a postcard from home for millions of Americans back in the day!

The turntable plinth is actually one of Martin Bastin's 'Max Plank' multi-layer plywood plinths with a veneered finish - a design copied by many!

Best regards,

BK

 

How 'bout Father Sydney MacEwan?? n/t., posted on March 18, 2017 at 15:39:05
kavakidd
Audiophile

Posts: 19871
Location: Upstate NY
Joined: April 15, 2004
Contributor
  Since:
April 21, 2004
-
"Man is the only animal that blushes - or needs to" Mark Twain

 

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