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Impressions of the Furutech GTX-D(R) Outlet (non-NCF version)

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Posted on September 19, 2016 at 17:27:33
bcowen
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Finally got around to installing the outlet this last weekend. But before I get into the sonics, I have to comment on the build quality of this thing. Yes, it's expensive, but this is a textbook example of getting what you pay for. Heavy, solid, beautifully finished, and the clamping arrangement for the AC wire is the best I've ever seen. No farting around wrapping the wire around a screw -- just strip, stick the wire in, and tighten the internal clamps down with the screw. Great contact area on the wire, and secure as hell. I was wowed.

Sonically, I'm happy to report that my pre-purchase concern of the rhodium plating adding brightness or forwardness has proven to be of no concern. Cooked it for a week, let it sit for a day, then installed it and let the system play through it overnight before giving it a critical listen. Doesn't do anything I don't like, and offers some nice improvements in microdynamics, bass punch, and harmonic detail over the Maestro. The Maestro itself is a well regarded outlet, and I really liked the sound of it. But after less than 2 years use, the contacts got so loose that it would barely hold the power cord in place. Build quality is not even in the same ballpark as the Furu. The Maestro provided a significant improvement over the contractor-grade outlet it replaced, and I won't say the amount of improvement with the Furu over the Maestro is the same - it's not. More incremental than significant. But the Furu does sound better, and comes across very evenly balanced. Yup, expensive (did I already say that?), but one of those purchases I'm pleased with and feel I got a good value for my money.

 

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So can I ask...., posted on September 20, 2016 at 08:20:55
plugmein
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why didn't you go for the NCF version it truly is another step ahead (sonically) than the original version. And not a huge difference in price. I paid $200 for the NCF version from a dealer here on the Asylum.

 

RE: So can I ask...., posted on September 20, 2016 at 17:58:15
bcowen
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I ended up with the non-NCF (and rhodium) by accident. I originally ordered the gold version due to my apprehension about the rhodium sound. The day after I ordered it, the dealer emailed to say he was out of stock of the gold and offered to send the rhodium for the same price. I wasn't about to ask him for the NCF version at the same price. :)

Happy now things worked out as they did -- the gold may have been the wrong way to go now that I've heard the rhodium.

 

RE: Impressions of the Furutech GTX-D(R) Outlet (non-NCF version), posted on September 20, 2016 at 18:06:24
Duster
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Posts: 12738
Location: Pacific Northwest
Joined: August 25, 2002



Image: Maestro AC Outlet

I can understand finding that a Maestro AC outlet sounded better than a typical Contractor Grade AC outlet, since the Maestro AC outlet is said to have gone through various treatments in order to make the product sound better. However, it is obvious to see the fundamental mechanical and electrical design of the Maestro product is no better than a typical hardware store variety Contractor Grade or maybe Spec Grade AC outlet available at Home Depot. I would bet that it's simply an inexpensive off-the-shelf commercial hardware store product that's been gussied up rather than a truly transformed AC outlet. It's the most unimpressive AC outlet product I came across in the past that claims to be better than bonafide Audio Grade AC outlets such as Furutech and Oyaide products. It's unfathomable to understand how the sonic improvements due to a Furutech GTX-D(R) AC outlet upgrade is "more incremental than significant" vs. a mundane Maestro AC outlet.

 

RE: Impressions of the Furutech GTX-D(R) Outlet (non-NCF version), posted on September 20, 2016 at 18:50:12
bcowen
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I'm just describing what I hear in my system, Duster. Perhaps the performance gap will widen as the Furutech gets more time on it. Probably will. But I'm happy with the way it sounds now, and if it continues to improve, then I certainly won't be unhappier.

 

RE: Impressions of the Furutech GTX-D(R) Outlet (non-NCF version), posted on September 20, 2016 at 19:30:23
Duster
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Hi bcowen,

Sorry for expressing such unbridled amazement, but the Furutech GTX-D NCF(R) installed in my main audio system is arguably the best example of a SOTA AC outlet I have ever experienced, perhaps even better than the Oyaide R1 from a sonically neutral if not ruthlessly revealing perspective. What make/model power cord(s) and AC plug(s) you are using with the Furutech GTX-D(R) AC outlet, at this time?

Cheers, Duster

 

RE: Impressions of the Furutech GTX-D(R) Outlet (non-NCF version), posted on September 20, 2016 at 19:39:36
jea48
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Not enough pics to tell who is making the Maestro duplex receptacle. I am pretty sure though it is not Hubbell or Leviton.

For what it's worth ,I believe, Wattgate audio duplex receptacles are made by Leviton per specs.
http://www.parts-express.com/wattgate-381-tr-au-grey-gold-plated-audio-grade-ac-receptacle-outlet--110-439

I am also pretty sure Synergistic Research Tesla Plex SE duplex receptacle are also made by Leviton per specs.
http://highend-electronics.com/products/synergistic-research-tesla-plex-se-receptacle

No mistaken Shunyata Research has Hubbell build their Shunyata - SR-Z1 AC Outlet to their specs.
https://www.musicdirect.com/store/shunyata-sr-z1-ac-outlet

 

RE: Impressions of the Furutech GTX-D(R) Outlet (non-NCF version), posted on September 20, 2016 at 19:58:32
Duster
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I'm sure you noticed the typically thin galvanized steel backstrap, and breakable bridge between the terminals of the split-duplex capable Maestro AC outlet, but those are only the most observable aspects shown within the image. The overall design seems nothing special vs. a more respectable Porter Port cryo'd Hubbell AC outlet, let alone that of the Furutech GTX-D(R) design. just my 2 cents

 

Told ya the Rhodium Was a nice improvement : ), posted on September 20, 2016 at 20:55:26
Cougar
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Glad to hear you are enjoying your new power tweaks/products.

 

RE: Impressions of the Furutech GTX-D(R) Outlet (non-NCF version), posted on September 21, 2016 at 06:58:20
jea48
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Hi Duster,

Quality wise the Furutech GTX-D(R)duplex receptacle beats the Maestro hands down. The Furutech GTX-D(R) is far out there by itself ahead of all the others, jmho. Everybody that has them loves them it seems. I have yet to read any posts where a person found something they liked better.
Of course burn-in of the Furutech GTX-D(R) duplex receptacle can be lengthy I have read. Hundreds of hours I have read. IF I were to buy one I would want it pre burned-in. Not sure how the OP bought his. I would have spent the extra money.

Though I do not own either I have read many posts and reviews of both receptacles. For a cheap looking outlet it has a surprising good following though.

Even the reviewer in this article commented on how the duplex looked.
"The Maestro is a rather ordinary looking spec-grade 20-amp outlet constructed with a high-purity copper:brass alloy without plating. It is cryogenically treated with a professional microprocessor-controlled deep immersion process followed up with a rather sticky sweet-smelling coating that not only damps resonances and vibration but also reduces EMI/RFI. Details on this were not forthcoming other than that it is a proprietary formulation developed by CruzeFIRST Audio."

Note nothing was said about the back strap. I do find that odd.... The OP has one, it would be nice if he would check to see if the back strap is made from ferrous (magnetic) steel and check it with a magnet to see if the magnet is attracted to the back strap. It could be the back strap is made from brass plated with some sort of vibration controlling material. IF steel though the magnet will stick to the back strap like glue.
Jim

 

RE: Impressions of the Furutech GTX-D(R) Outlet (non-NCF version), posted on September 21, 2016 at 07:14:10
jea48
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The Maestro itself is a well regarded outlet, and I really liked the sound of it. But after less than 2 years use, the contacts got so loose that it would barely hold the power cord in place.

Copper alone does not have memory retention. Maestro uses brass in the mix for memory retention but it sounds from your experience it's not working well.

Note that the Furutech GTX-D(R) uses high grade non ferrous stainless steel spring clips on the outside of the high quality copper female plug-in contacts to maintain constant reliable contact pressure against the male plug blades. The memory retention life of the stainless steel spring clips will more than likely out live the life of the user....

 

RE: Impressions of the Furutech GTX-D(R) Outlet (non-NCF version), posted on September 21, 2016 at 14:44:31
bcowen
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The stock outlet for the Maestro is apparently made by Cooper. There's no marking anywhere on the outlet indicating the manufacturer, but in molded print around the center screw hole is "Screw-Catch" with a trademark symbol. That trademark is owned by Cooper. It's a spec grade outlet, with Made in China stamped into the backstrap. The backstrap itself is POS (ie: plain old steel), ferrous, and probably 20 gauge (maybe 18).

I bought the Furutech without any burn-in services, but let it cook on the Audiodharma cooker for a week before installing it. Long enough? I don't know....we'll see. And no argument whatsoever on the build quality of the Furutech. It was almost a shame to stuff it in the wall as much of a work of art that it is. :)

 

RE: Impressions of the Furutech GTX-D(R) Outlet (non-NCF version), posted on September 21, 2016 at 14:50:22
bcowen
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Duster,

I'm using a Zu Event (Mk 1) PC into the outlet feeding the Furutech e-tp60 outlet box. The DIY cord I just made will go in that spot next, as soon as I have time to give it a proper audition to compare to the Zu.

 

RE: Told ya the Rhodium Was a nice improvement : ), posted on September 21, 2016 at 14:55:12
bcowen
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Thanks Cougar. Should have never doubted you. :)

 

RE: Impressions of the Furutech GTX-D(R) Outlet (non-NCF version), posted on September 21, 2016 at 15:51:55
Duster
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Posts: 12738
Location: Pacific Northwest
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Image: Cooper BR20 AC Outlet

I think it's safe to assume the Maestro AC outlet is a Cooper brand product that's essentially the same or similar to the Cooper BR20 Commercial Grade AC outlet available at Lowe's for $3.47. If so, the Maestro AC outlet is nothing more than an ordinary hardware store product that's been cryo'd and treated with a sweet smelling, sticky substance (snake oil?). Perhaps this unknown coating is what can supposedly make a $3.47 AC outlet sound superior to a Furutech or Oyaide product. Sorry for the snarky commentary, but this type of thing can affect the reputation of bonafide Audio Grade AC products. I'm sure you will fully enjoy the new Furutech GTX-D(R) AC outlet, bcowen!

See link:

 

RE: Impressions of the Furutech GTX-D(R) Outlet (non-NCF version), posted on September 21, 2016 at 18:41:08
bcowen
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Duster,

Who said the Maestro sounded superior to the Furutech (or an Oyaide)? I didn't. I've never had an Oyaide, but I quite clearly stated the Furutech sounded better than the Maestro, and pointed out a few areas where it excelled. I'm not sure how you're concluding that I consider the Maestro superior, as I wrote nothing to even suggest that.


 

RE: Impressions of the Furutech GTX-D(R) Outlet (non-NCF version), posted on September 22, 2016 at 07:43:15
jea48
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Looks like the same receptacle as the Maestro to me.

$85.00 for the Maestro verses the Cooper bought at Lowes for $3.47.

It's not the intoxicating sweet smelling snake oil treatment and the fancy box that justifies the $85.00 price tag. It's the advertising scam that seems to draw the buyer in.

Quote from Link below:

However, like the heavily modified Acoustic Revive Oyaide R-1 receptacle, the Maestro is also heavily modified. Here's what it says about the Maestro out on the cruzeFIRST website:

"We auditioned everything out there and found that while some outlets worked extremely well in some areas at the end of the day they all did more harm than good by masking and bloating the music. Most of them altered or equalized the sound because of the fancy plating and the mixture of alloys used. In addition, we believe that mechanical resonance and tuning is also important in Audio grade outlets and this is another area where most other outlets fall short."

""The Maestro Outlet" is a simple but effective power outlet made from a high-purity copper/brass alloy mix with no plating. It is 20-amp rated and built to exacting standards. The outlet is then taken through a professional microprocessor controlled deep cryogenic process and then treated with our special coating for RFI / EMI interference rejection and enhanced for mechanical dampening. Finally it is taken through our proprietary break-in process for 2 weeks. The result is an incredible "Bare Passage To The Music Source"."

And how did it sound to the reviewer?

I let my system warm up for a while then put on some LPs for a little listening. So what did the Maestro sound like? Pretty darn good actually. I'll have the full story on these high-performance outlets in the article I'll be writing for Positive Feedback Online, and I'll try to share some more impressions about the Maestro as I get a little more familiar with what it can do.

Steel back strap and all. And just a guess the body and face plate that holds the contacts of the stock cooper duplex receptacle, that retails for $3.47, is made of cheap plastic. Of course the stock receptacle is heavily modified as explained in the quote above.

Just my opinion of course.....

//

For anyone interested, I have some used Maestro Outlets for sale for a bargain price of $20.00 each plus shipping. Sorry, I no longer have the box or packaging material the outlets came in. Used, but they look brand new!

 

RE: Impressions of the Furutech GTX-D(R) Outlet (non-NCF version), posted on September 22, 2016 at 11:27:54
Duster
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I didn't say that about you, bcowen. Take a look at cruzeFIRST Audio's Maestro Outlet web page. The text clearly implies that the Maestro product is a better sounding AC outlet than products such as those from Furutech and Oyaide:

"We auditioned everything out there and found that while some outlets worked extremely well in some areas at the end of the day they all did more harm than good by masking and bloating the music. Most of them altered or equalized the sound because of the fancy plating and the mixture of alloys used. In addition, we believe that mechanical resonance and tuning is also important in Audio grade outlets and this is another area where most other outlets fall short."

http://www.cruzefirstaudio.com/maestro_outlet.htm

As for their statement that "mechanical resonance and tuning is also important in Audio grade outlets and this is another area where most other outlets fall short" is an outrageous accusation, since other than the matter of conductivity, true Audio Grade AC outlets address resonance issues more than any hardware store AC outlet can provide. Coating a cheap AC outlet with inherently bad resonance control with an unknown substance cannot compensate for the very poor mechanical characteristics of a typical cheap AC outlet. Folks can find various information sourced from Furutech and Oyaide that explains how vital it is to design an Audio Grade AC outlet with high-performance resonance control, and how their products don't "fall short" in this regard.

 

RE: Impressions of the Furutech GTX-D(R) Outlet (non-NCF version), posted on September 22, 2016 at 12:03:33
Duster
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The most incriminating aspect regarding the Maestro product is bcowen's report that the cheap Cooper brand AC outlet the Maestro product is based on failed so soon. There is no excuse to claim that a product is high-quality when it's obvious that the seller is offering a polished turd rather than a competitive product.

If the Maestro product is actually based on the same model, or is similar to the Cooper BR20 Commercial Grade AC outlet available at Lowe's for $3.47, the premise of the Maestro product is apparently of the same cheap quality as what some folks are trying to replace!

Text taken from thefreedictionary.com:

Commercial Grade

Adj. 1. commercial-grade - of the kind or quality used in commerce; average or inferior; "commercial grade of beef"; "commercial oxalic acid" - commercial - inferior - of low or inferior quality

See link:

 

RE: Impressions of the Furutech GTX-D(R) Outlet (non-NCF version), posted on September 22, 2016 at 14:04:30
jea48
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The most incriminating aspect regarding the Maestro product is bcowen's report that the cheap Cooper brand AC outlet the Maestro product is based on failed so soon. There is no excuse to claim that a product is high-quality when it's obvious that the seller is offering a polished turd rather than a competitive product.

If we take cruzeFIRST at their word the hot and neutral contacts on the Maestro outlet are made from a "high-purity copper/brass alloy mix". The stock commercial grade Cooper outlet, that probably just uses brass contacts, may be just fine for normal use as found in an office building. I would think they are UL tested/Listed.

What separates Extra Heavy Duty Industrial Series receptacles made by the likes of Hubbell and Leviton is their ability to withstand side to side plug pulling pressure abuse. Especially the Hubbell receptacles. I have never seen the front face plate on a Hubbell receptacle broken. And I am talking about an Extra Heavy Duty Industrial Series Hubbell receptacle that might be 40 years old. The plug blade to receptacle Contact pressure might not be as good as it was when new but it still would beat many spec grade receptacles made today. The Hubbell is built to take abuse.

That might explain the retail price of the HBL5362 Extra Heavy Duty Industrial Series Duplex Receptacle at $28.20 each.

 

RE: Impressions of the Furutech GTX-D(R) Outlet (non-NCF version), posted on September 22, 2016 at 15:38:02
Duster
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jea48 wrote:

"If we take cruzeFIRST at their word the hot and neutral contacts on the Maestro outlet are made from a "high-purity copper/brass alloy mix".

First off, "high-purity copper/brass alloy mix" does not make sense. High-purity copper is not an alloy, whereas brass is an alloy. Does the term "mix" mean that at some point an element within the conductive path is a brass alloy, and at some point an element within the conductive path is pure copper? I don't think so, since I can't take cruzeFIRST at their word. I'm sure they are obscuring the fact that the hot and neutral contacts are simply the stock brass contacts of a cheap Cooper brand AC outlet.

As for a heavy duty Spec Grade or Hospital Grade Hubbell, they are built like a tank when compared to a Commercial Grade AC plug. True Audio Grade AC outlets include a more rigid plastic body and face that sometimes involves a fiber-reinforced polymer and dielectric dissipation materials which contributes to better electrical, rigidity and resonance control; heavy duty, larger mass conductive contacts that contribute to better conductivity and resonance control; a high-mass solid brass backstrap for greater rigidity and resonance control. A true Audio Grade AC outlet must perform a big step further than ordinary AC outlets.

Another vital matter to address is to invest in an audiophile quality AC wall plate. It's a very worthwhile thing to do, IME.

 

RE: Impressions of the Furutech GTX-D(R) Outlet (non-NCF version), posted on September 22, 2016 at 16:54:59
jea48
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As for a heavy duty Spec Grade or Hospital Grade Hubbell, they are built like a tank when compared to a Commercial Grade AC plug. True Audio Grade AC outlets include a more rigid plastic body and face that sometimes involves a fiber-reinforced polymer and dielectric dissipation materials which contributes to better electrical, rigidity and resonance control; heavy duty, larger mass conductive contacts that contribute to better conductivity and resonance control; a high-mass solid brass backstrap for greater rigidity and resonance control. A true Audio Grade AC outlet must perform a big step further than ordinary AC outlets.


Apples and oranges. I never said the Hubbell HBL5362 Extra Heavy Duty Industrial Series duplex receptacle was an Hi-end audio grade outlet.

As for an audio grade duplex receptacle's durability under pressure compared to the HBL5362 it would be interesting to install one in an industrial plant and see how it holds up to the everyday abuse it would be subjected to. It would be interesting to see how the male plug blade to female contact holding pressure of the receptacle holds up after just a few years of service, let alone 40 years. Plugging a plug straight in and pulling it straight out is one thing. Applying excessive side to side pressure to the female contacts of a receptacle is quite another.

Best regards,
Jim

 

RE: Impressions of the Furutech GTX-D(R) Outlet (non-NCF version), posted on September 22, 2016 at 18:05:50
Duster
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Hi jea48,

Sorry, I'm being misunderstood in this thread. I should not have written "jea48 wrote:" at the beginning of the message.

I didn't mean to direct anything towards you, I simply responded to what cruzeFIRST said, then added my comment about Audio Grade AC outlets.

I reckon there is an industry standard that dictates what can be called an Extra Heavy Duty Industrial AC outlet, perhaps in the same manner as what can be called a Hospital Grade AC outlet. This might involve actual stress tests, including severe mechanical force stress tests.

Cheers, Duster

 

RE: Impressions of the Furutech GTX-D(R) Outlet (non-NCF version), posted on September 22, 2016 at 18:07:31
mitch2
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Just found a new one today for a very good price and purchased it to replace a Porter Port for two monoblocks. Hoping to hear good things.

 

RE: Impressions of the Furutech GTX-D(R) Outlet (non-NCF version), posted on September 22, 2016 at 19:20:42
alan m. kafton
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I reckon there is an industry standard that dictates what can be called an Extra Heavy Duty Industrial AC outlet, perhaps in the same manner as what can be called a Hospital Grade AC outlet. This might involve actual stress tests, including severe mechanical force stress tests.

There is, on both counts, in addition to the capacity testing for voltage & current.

 

RE: Receptacle grade specs, posted on September 23, 2016 at 06:14:56
cdb
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There are only 4 grades of receptacles defined in ANSI/UL Standards.

General Use
Hospital
Federal Spec.
Combo Hospital/ Federal Spec.

All else - "Pro Line, Heavy Duty, Extra Heavy Duty, Industrial, Spec Grade, Commercial, Residential Grade" - is Marketing Dept. created. IOW there is no overarching standard governing what a "heavy duty" receptacle is. Or pickup truck, or drill, or screwdriver for that matter.

This is not to imply that there aren't differences between sub-$1.00 receptacles that come in "contractor packs" of 10 and individually packaged industrial heavy duty receptacles.

Since the below linky was written (2005), the General Use category may now have NEC required subsets of:
WR - Weather Resistant
TR - Tamper Resistant

 

RE: 5362 number, posted on September 23, 2016 at 06:23:43
cdb
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Since most if not all major manufacturers make a 5362 (and its variants), any idea where this (and other) numbers came from?

I actually called up Leviton one time about this, and the kid who answered was completely lost, and said something about the marketing department.

 

RE: 5362 number, posted on September 24, 2016 at 09:34:11
jea48
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cdb said:
Since most if not all major manufacturers make a 5362 (and its variants), any idea where this (and other) numbers came from?


I am not really sure. I think it has something to do with NEMA, ANSI, and UL standards.

I did a web search for, what is a NEMA 5362 receptacle and here is what I found.


//


Leviton 5362 duplex receptacle

Leviton's line of Extra Heavy-Duty Industrial Grade receptacles are designed and manufactured to withstand the harsh conditions typically associated with industrial environments. Available in a wide variety of configurations, including isolated ground, tamper-resistant, hospital grade, etc., these Industrial Grade devices are the electrical contractor's choice for use in factories, schools, hospitals and commercial office buildings.

Technical Information:

AC Horsepower Ratings
At Rated Voltage: 1 HP
Electrical Specifications
Grounding: Self-Grounding
Amperage: 20 Amp
Voltage: 125 Volt
NEMA: 5-20R
Pole: 2
Wire: 3
Dielectric Voltage: Withstands 2000V per UL498
Current Limiting: Full Rated Current
Temperature Rise: Max 30C after 250 cycles OL at 200 percent rated current
Environmental Specifications
Flammability: Rated V-2 per UL94
Operating Temperature: -40C to 60C
Material Specifications
Face Material: Thermoplastic Nylon
Body Material: Thermoplastic Nylon
Strap Material: Brass
Line Contacts: Brass Triple-Wipe
Terminal Screws: Brass 10-32
Grounding Screw: Brass 8-32
Clamp Nuts: Zinc-Plated Steel
Ground Clips: Brass-Plated
Color: White

Mechanical Specifications
Terminal ID: Brass-Hot, Green-Ground, Silver-Neutral
Terminal Accom.: 14-10 AWG
Product ID: Ratings are permanently marked on device
Product Features
NEMA: 5-20R
Color: White
Standards and Certifications
NEMA: WD-1 & WD-6
ANSI: C-73
UL498: File E13399
UL Fed Spec WC-596: File E13399
CSA C22.2 No. 42: File 152105
NOM: 057
Warranty: 10 Year Limited


http://www.leviton.com/OA_HTML/ProductDetail.jsp?partnumber=5362-W§ion=42416&minisite=10251


//


Hubbell HBL5362

HBL5362 -- Straight Blade Products, Heavy Duty Specification Grade Duplex Receptacle

Receptacle Style Duplex
Face Shape Traditional
Standard NEMA
Amperage 20A
Voltage 125V
Poles and Wires 2 Pole, 3-Wire Grounding
Wiring Method Back and Side
Hospital Grade ? No
Receptacle Grade Extra Heavy Duty Spec Grade
Face Style Finder Groove
Color
Other Available Colors Brown, Black, Gray, Ivory, Red, White
NEMA No. 5-20R
Horsepower 1
Type 2 Pole, 3 Wire, Grounding
Rating 20A, 125V
Certification -UL Listed to UL498 File E2186, Guide RTRT Fed Spec WC596G, Meets WD-1 Heavy Duty and WD-6 requirements, Certified to CSA, C22.2, No. 42 file 285.
Terminal Screw Material #10-32 Silicon Bronze (Ni plate if neutral)
Ground Screw Material #10-32 Silicon Bronze (Green)
Top Material Nylon
Base Material Reinforced PET
Power Contacts Material .037" (.9) Brass
Mounting Strap Material .050" (1.3) Brass
Auto Ground Clip Material Stainless Steel
Mounting Screw Material Steel-Zinc Plated
Dielectric Voltage Withstands 2,000V minimum.
Current Interrupting Certified for current interrupting at full rated current.
Temperature Rise Max 30�C temperature rise at full rated current after 50 cycles of overload at 150% of rated current at a power factor of 75%..
Terminal Identification Terminals identified in accordance with UL498 (Brass, White, Green).
Terminal Accommodation #14-#10 AWG copper stranded or solid conductor only.
Product Identification Ratings are a permanent part of the device.
Flammability UL 94 V2 or better
Operating Temperatures Maximum continuous 75�C, minimum -40�C (w/o impact).
UPC Number 783585435220
Weight in LBs 0.250

http://www.hubbellcatalog.com/wiring/section-a-datasheet.asp?FAM=Straight_Blade&PN=HBL5362


//


I even found Cooper.

Cooper makes a heavy duty 5362 duplex receptacle under their Arrow Hart brand name. See page 7 of the link below.


https://www.gexpro.com/medias/sys_master/gexpro/gexproimages/8994259959838.pdf?mime=application%2Fpdf&realname=idw-cooper-wiring-devices-cwd-straightbladereceptacles-broch-brochure.pdf

 

RE: Impressions of the Furutech GTX-D(R) Outlet (non-NCF version), posted on September 24, 2016 at 12:51:36
JKT
Audiophile

Posts: 475
Location: Midwest
Joined: November 26, 2002
"high-purity copper/brass alloy mix"

Brass is an alloy of copper and zinc. The above statement strikes me as an abuse of language and sheer marketing BS.


"It is better to remain silent and thought a fool, then speak and remove all doubt." A. Lincoln

 

Not quite...., posted on September 24, 2016 at 15:33:53
alan m. kafton
Manufacturer

Posts: 4839
Joined: April 7, 2000
There are different "mixes" of copper & brass, with lesser-grade connectors and outlets having a lesser-amount of copper content.

I know this as factual when I was researching Hubbell products 16-18 years ago. Their spec-grade, heavy-duty products had a much higher amount of copper (ranging from 70-72%, depending on the batch) versus their commercial-grade products, which had (if memory serves) approx. a 55-56% copper content.

However, if a company marketing connectors & outlets stating that their products contain "high-purity copper" cannot back up that statement, then indeed you are correct. In other words, "high-purity copper" compared to what? And what defines "high-purity copper"....what's the percentage vs. the brass alloy? In my view, if a product doesn't meet Hubbell's high standards of content, it ain't "high-purity".

 

RE: Not quite...., posted on September 24, 2016 at 19:29:12
Duster
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Posts: 12738
Location: Pacific Northwest
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The bottom line is the terminology they use may be a misnomer or just sloppy hype. If one picks-apart the wording, the term "high-purity copper/brass alloy mix" would either mean a high-purity copper element is added to an undetermined quality brass alloy element as a special "mix" which would mean the result is some sort of exotic alloy, *-or-* the conductive path features both high-purity copper parts and brass alloy parts used in tandem, *-or-* what is being referred to is the copper content of the brass alloy is that of a high-purity copper element added to the zinc element, which would make more sense. However, one should find out what purity of copper is actually implemented by Cooper brand in terms of the actual copper they use to manufacture their stock brass AC outlet, since in my opinion, cruzeFIRST has no credibility when it comes to the apparent design of their questionable Maestro AC outlet to believe it's nothing more than a cryo'd and mysteriously treated stock Cooper brand product.

 

RE: Not quite...., posted on September 25, 2016 at 09:47:53
bcowen
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  Since:
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All this discussion on the Maestro piqued my curiosity, so with outlet in hand I paid a visit to my neighbor down the street. I knew he was an engineer for an electrical component manufacturer and worked specifically on switches and outlets. Turns out he works for Pass and Seymour. I handed him the Maestro and asked him if there was anything special about it. He gave it a once over, then asked if I minded if he popped off the backstrap (sure). "Yup, it's a spec grade Cooper outlet," says he. Nothing wrong with it, but he thought (naturally) that P&S's comparable offering was better. :) I asked about the alloy of the contacts, and he said that he wouldn't know without the spec sheet for it but that it looked and felt (he bent the ground contacts back and forth) like pretty normal metallurgy for that grade of an outlet. Then I told him that it was cryogenically treated and had some sort of EMI/RFI shielding or absorbing substance applied to it. His comment on the cryogenic treatment was "whatever" (remember, he's an engineer), and then commented that if the EMI/RFI substance was in any way conductive, the UL listing would be void. He noted the UL logo was still intact on the backstrap, and wondered if Cooper knew this substance was being applied and the outlet subsequently being resold with their UL listing.

Then I told him the price of the outlet, and he cracked up.

So, what we have is a standard $4 outlet (probably much less than that when bought in quantity) that's given a cryogenic treatment and then has some unique mystery substance applied to it. On one hand, I don't see anything on the Cruzefirst site that is making false claims or stating anything that isn't true ("high purity" is obviously a subjective description that can't be quantified). On the other hand, the total cost of this $85 outlet must be somewhere around $5, FWIW.

 

RE: Not quite...., posted on September 25, 2016 at 13:48:12
Duster
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Posts: 12738
Location: Pacific Northwest
Joined: August 25, 2002
That's an excellent follow-up on your part, bcowen!

While the seller may not have published the type of evidence that points to false claims based on factual data, the sales pitch is misleading and implies the product is a superior competitor vs. bonafide Audio Grade AC outlets. Based on a fundamental marketing perspective, it's unethical for a seller to take advantage of a niche market product category like Audio Grade AC outlets, which are comparatively far more expensive based on credible material costs, manufacturing costs, and performance levels vs. hardware store variety AC outlets. As much as some folks rant about the high-price of Audio Grade AC outlets, at least a buyer tends to get what they pay for, while the truly inferior product in question seems to be a classic example of a rip-off scheme. I imagine the seller laughing out loud whenever an $85 payment was submitted for their cheap AC outlet.

 

If the Cooper / Cruze outlet...., posted on September 25, 2016 at 15:21:56
alan m. kafton
Manufacturer

Posts: 4839
Joined: April 7, 2000
....can be taken apart, then it would be easy to apply a contact enhancer on the surfaces that meet the wall plug's 3 prongs, including the ground. Some contact enhancers dry after application, others leave a pasty residue, but my favorite (Stabilant-22) leaves a micron-thin slick coating. I don't know about the others, but I don't believe that Stabilant is in any way conductive....but it certainly improves connectivity and conductivity.

Anyway, did you run your fingers over the internal contacts and feel (or see) any slickness, moisture, or residue?

 

RE: If the Cooper / Cruze outlet...., posted on September 25, 2016 at 16:14:08
bcowen
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I felt the safety ground contacts -- they are attached to the backstrap, and slide out when the backstrap is removed. Didn't detect any substance on them visually or by feel. The contacts for hot and neutral can't be accessed as they are completely enclosed in the housing, and the two halves of the housing are ultrasonically welded together (according to my neighbor). You'd likely destroy the outlet trying to separate them. I guess something could be put in through the plug slots, but I'm guessing that this EMI/RFI substance is applied to the exterior only.

 

RE: Not quite...., posted on September 25, 2016 at 16:21:30
bcowen
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I'm in agreement with you on this, Duster. Had I known what I know now when I purchased the Maestro, I wouldn't have purchased it.

 

RE: Not quite...., posted on September 25, 2016 at 17:53:05
Duster
Audiophile

Posts: 12738
Location: Pacific Northwest
Joined: August 25, 2002
I should have investigated the product when it was first mentioned in Audio Asylum.

As I recall, I decided not to protest against discussions coming from people who advocated it, at the time.

I didn't want to appear combative in the forum, and would refuse to buy one in order to evaluate the product within my own audio system...

 

RE: Not quite...., posted on September 26, 2016 at 09:48:38
Crazy Dave
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Posts: 12654
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I am often astounded by you patience. Thank you for keeping things civil while still getting you point across.

Dave

 

RE: Not quite...., posted on September 26, 2016 at 12:46:26
Duster
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Posts: 12738
Location: Pacific Northwest
Joined: August 25, 2002
Thanks for the kind words, Dave.

 

Duster, your thoughts, posted on September 28, 2016 at 07:26:04
jea48
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  Since:
January 6, 2005
Synergistic Black UEF Duplex Receptacle.

http://highend-electronics.com/products/synergistic-research-black-uef-duplex-receptacle

.

The outlet looks like it is made by Pass & Seymour.

http://www.lowes.com/pd/Pass-Seymour-Legrand-20-Amp-125-Volt-Black-Indoor-Duplex-Wall-Tamper-Resistant-Outlet/3364978

Is the back strap made from galvanized Steel on the Synergistic Black AC outlet?
It sure looks like galvanized steel.

 

RE: Duster, your thoughts, posted on September 28, 2016 at 13:19:55
Duster
Audiophile

Posts: 12738
Location: Pacific Northwest
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Other than a small tab that extends from the thin galvanized steel backstrap between the mounting ears, it does look to be the same Pass & Seymour Spec Grade AC outlet available at Lowe's for $5.98. The product seems to be another example of an attempt to make a silk purse out of a sow's ear via special treatments rather than designing and manufacturing a superior product with audiophile-quality electrical and mechanical characteristics in the first place, IMO.

 

RE: Duster, your thoughts, posted on September 28, 2016 at 15:15:52
jea48
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Posts: 6658
Location: Midwest
Joined: January 5, 2005
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Other than a small tab that extends from the thin galvanized steel backstrap between the mounting ears, it does look to be the same Pass & Seymour Spec Grade AC outlet available at Lowe's for $5.98.

Yes I noticed the tab between the ears as you did. I think the P&S outlet at Lowes is a older model. The tabs on back strap are for Decora outlets. The tab is drilled and 6/32 tapped to support the Decora cover plate

If you look close at the Synergistic Black UEF duplex receptacle you can see what appears to be the P&S logo in the upper left hand side just below the back strap ear of picture 2 of 3. On the other back strap support end you can see the words "Spec Grade". Also note both outlets use the same auto ground spring system for the 6/32 outlet support screws.

It is possible though the Synergistic Black UEF duplex receptacle uses a higher grade/quality P&S outlet. I would still be willing to bet the back strap is galvanized steel.

.

Synergistic Black UEF Duplex Receptacle.
http://highend-electronics.com/products/synergistic-research-black-uef-duplex-receptacle

 

RE: Not quite...., posted on December 29, 2016 at 09:18:29
InFidelity
Audiophile

Posts: 1
Location: ATX
Joined: December 29, 2016
Duster,
Over the years, I have enjoyed your postings and feedback, but I do not understand your witch hunt on the Maestro outlet.

How are they any different than what Shunyata does with a Hubbell 5362 outlet or what Synergistic Research does with a Leviton outlet?

Have you actually compared the sound of the Maestro to a Shunyata or a Porter Port, or for that matter, the Cooper BR20 which it is based on. I have, and in my experience, the Maestro just simply sounds better than all of them.

 

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