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Stranded or solid?

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Posted on September 18, 2020 at 08:25:08
Batman
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I'm about to wire Cat6 to create an access point at the other end of the house. The run from my Verizon router to the switch at the other end is 41 feet. Should I use stranded or solid cable? Over this distance, does it matter.

My preference is stranded for its flexibility even though I don't anticipate move the router or switch very often.


 

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RE: Stranded or solid?, posted on September 18, 2020 at 14:06:05
AbeCollins
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Technically it isn't going to matter in terms of performance over that distance. It might matter for a 10-Gigabit network, but not for the more common 1-Gigabit household network. I seriously doubt that ANY of your gear is 10-Gigabit capable.

Solid conductor CAT cables are typically run in walls while patch cables use stranded conductors. Additionally, you probably want to run "in-wall rated" cable (if you are in fact running cable in your walls) if you're concerned with building codes. These produce less toxic fumes if they catch fire.



 

Thanks, posted on September 18, 2020 at 16:15:54
Batman
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That's what the internet said. Think I'll use stranded since I'm only going through the open rafters in the laundry room. Then, I can use whatever is left over for patch cables.


 

The Easy Button, posted on September 18, 2020 at 17:08:45
AbeCollins
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To keep things simple you could buy a 50-ft run of CAT6 cable, already terminated with the RJ45 connector plugs at each end.

Not "best practice" but you can extend the length if the cable is too short using an inline Ethernet coupler.

Inline Ethernet Couplers

Everything mentioned above is available for CAT6 compatibility.

P.S. I have a 25 foot run of CAT5e patch cable in the basement rafters running from my Wifi router over to my audio rack with network streamer.



 

Yabbut, posted on September 19, 2020 at 06:52:31
Batman
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Thanks

Since I have to drill through the hardwood floor upstairs, and then through six or seven rafters downstairs, I don't want to drill a hole large enough for the RJ-45 plug. I'll cut off the plug and only drill a 5/16 hole to pass the cable through. I have a crimper to re-attach RJ-45's at the far end.

The remaining cable I'll use to make patch cables to run to the access points (2) from the Ethernet switch.


 

Ah, you might want to....., posted on September 19, 2020 at 12:26:14
AbeCollins
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IMHO, the hole size difference is not that great but that's obviously a personal decision.

If you want to drill a smaller hole then crimp a new RJ45, you will definitely be better off with solid conductor cable as the crimp-on RJ45 is not meant to accept stranded wires..... as best I can tell. My RJ45 crimp connectors are meant for solid.



 

Solid...., posted on September 19, 2020 at 12:44:59
Rod M
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You can't terminate stranded as easily if you need to use bulk cable or cut off the RJ-45 to get through walls. I don't think bulk cable even comes in stranded.

-Rod

 

Or, instead..., posted on September 19, 2020 at 14:20:21
mlsstl
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... of attaching a plug after pulling the wire, consider putting on a RJ45 jack instead, and then running a patch cord from the wall jack to the device. I find RJ45 jacks a bit easier to install than crimping a new plug on a cable.

I just did this at our new house when I wanted to move the AT&T gigabit router from one room to another.

 

RE: Ah, you might want to....., posted on September 20, 2020 at 10:32:07
Bob_C
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"as best I can tell. My RJ45 crimp connectors are meant for solid."

They do make plugs to crimp stranded cable also.I have used them, but prefer solid cable. When you look closely at the stranded connector the tines in the connector pierce the wires whereas the solid crimp wraps around the conductor.








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RE: The Easy Button, posted on September 20, 2020 at 14:14:36
E-Stat
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My run upstairs is a single 50' cable. It feeds up the built-in shelving in the office up through the ceiling into the attic space where it curves around and enters the music room - which is actually just a large bedroom.

I just drilled the openings large enough to support the plug.

 

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