Computer Audio Asylum

Music servers and other computer based digital audio technologies.

Return to Computer Audio Asylum


Message Sort: Post Order or Asylum Reverse Threaded

Your HELP Is Needed

67.8.39.61

Posted on August 17, 2020 at 12:31:25
thetubeguy1954
Audiophile

Posts: 5854
Location: Orlando, Fla
Joined: January 7, 2001
I've been involved in audio since 1964 when I was 10 and I heard The Beatles play on The Ed Sullivan Show! I now own a 135lb, 40W/ch, Mastersound Reference 845, parallel, single-ended, triode amp/integrated amp, a YBA Genesis CD-4, CDP --{used strictly as a transport}-- a Musical Paradise MP-D2, tubed DAC and a pair of Reference 3A Taksim speakers. Along with various high-end ICs, digital and speaker wires as well as power cords.

I've ONLY mentioned all that to let you know I've been involved in audio for almost 56 years now and have a decent, high-end, audio system that I've come to discover is entry-level, by many people's standards today. I guess I shouldn't be surprised when I see amps, preamps, DACs etc, that cost more than my entire system does. But I digress. You see, I've also come to discover that despite my 56 years involved in audio and all the knowledge I've acquired over these many years, I desperately need YOUR help.

The reason I need your help is due to the fact I'm finally getting into "Computer Audio." A friend recently gave me an Oppo BDP-93 to get me involved. I'm disabled and it's getting worse with every passing year. It would be very convenient to have all my music in one location. But truth be told I'm completely lost with Computer Audio! I feel like I've entered an alien world where I don't speak the language and haven't the foggiest idea of what's happening! With that all being said, my friend told me I need to locate and buy a powered, 2TB, external HD! There's just one caveat, it cannot be a portable USB powered HD! I need to locate a desktop HD with its own external power! Can anyone here help me locate such a 2TB, HD with its own external power that's reasonably priced? I can find many portable USB powered external HDs, but not one desktop powered HD with its own external power. Your help would be deeply appreciated...



Thetubeguy1954 (Tom)

Central Florida Audio Society -- SETriodes Group -- Space Coast Audio Society
Full-range/Wide-range Drivers --- Front & Back-Loaded Horns --- High Sensitivity Speakers


 

Hide full thread outline!
    ...
Good luck, posted on August 17, 2020 at 14:26:00
E-Stat
Audiophile

Posts: 29721
Joined: May 12, 2000
Contributor
  Since:
April 5, 2002
there's lots to learn but much to benefit.

I have an Oppo 103 but rarely use it for file playback as the interface is crude. Spend some time around here and you'll find the most cost effective answer - albeit with some DIY is the Raspberry Pi platform. There are multiple flavors of free software you can use with it. Remote control via smartphone, pad or watch.

As for your specific question, there companies like Sabrent who make enclosures for 2.5 and 3.5" hard drives that are externally powered. I leverage an older 3.5 drive for backup duties using one.

 

RE: Your HELP Is Needed, posted on August 17, 2020 at 23:16:34
soundchekk
Audiophile

Posts: 2161
Joined: July 11, 2007
Not sure why the storage should be powered externally!?!?

And then - why looking for a HD ? It's 2020.

A 2TB (if that's really needed) SSD will IMO be the much better choice.
An SSD is extremely fast and responsive, lightweight, very low on power consumption and free of noise.

Keep in mind. You also need a backup disk or better two of them
(short/long term backup) btw.

The backup media could be made of hard disks if cost is an issue.
I'd still prefer at least the short term backup media to be an SSD.

When it comes to powering and cabling. I prefer USB-SATA cables to use internal storage devices as external storage.
Many of these USB-Sata adapters are also available with external power options on the SATA plug. Such a solution would give you maximum flexibility.

However.

If I were to start into Computer Audio today, I would go for a HQ streaming service. Many people underestimate the time and money that goes into building and managing your own collection.


Good luck on your journey.

 

RE: Your HELP Is Needed, posted on August 18, 2020 at 04:22:40
thetubeguy1954
Audiophile

Posts: 5854
Location: Orlando, Fla
Joined: January 7, 2001
Soundchekk, thank you for the time you took. Your reply was very incisive and informative! You gave me a lot to think about. I agree 100% with your info about the backup drives. About fifteen years ago I was a PC Tech who helped the LAN Admin during my downtime. His philosophy was you always wanted three backup drives, the first one would be right next to the computer with the drive you backed up, the second backup drive would be placed at the opposite side of the building the PC was in --{the reason for this was "if" the PC and first HD were damaged due to something that happening, i.e., water damage or a fire in the room they were kept in, the second one at the opposite side of the building should be safe}-- finally the third one should be kept off-premises, the LAN Admin kept this one at his home. This was in case something traumatic occurred, i.e., the entire building burned down, at least you'd have a copy of all your data!

I see absolutely no difference with music HD or SSD backups. From what I've learned so far even if you forget about how long it can take loading 2TB+ of music on HD or SSD the way you like it kept. If you were to lose your storage and playback device(s) due to your home burning down, you'll probably also lose all your CDs as well. So unless you have one of your backup devices kept at a friend's home your music collection would be lost for good. Personally, that's not a place I'd like to start from again...



Thetubeguy1954 (Tom)

Central Florida Audio Society -- SETriodes Group -- Space Coast Audio Society
Full-range/Wide-range Drivers --- Front & Back-Loaded Horns --- High Sensitivity Speakers


 

RE: Your HELP Is Needed, posted on August 18, 2020 at 09:44:06
zacster
Audiophile

Posts: 1570
Location: NYC
Joined: November 22, 2003
At this point in the evolution of computer audio I'd skip the storage altogether and just go with a streaming service. Yes there is a monthly fee but if you by even one cd a month that will pay for it. You already have a computer and internet service I assume and likely home WiFi too and with that you really only need a device to act as a receiver and a cheap raspberry pi can do that. You plug the DAC into the pi USB port and that is the only physical connection needed. You need software on the pi and the computer but even that is easy enough. You'll have plenty of help here if you go that route.

I have an Oppo 93 myself and I don't see how that would even fit in. I never use mine anymore as I don't play discs of any type anymore. If your friend is suggesting it as a front end it is a rather poor one. The remote is so slow as to be useless. It was one of those internet hyped devices that was supposed to be better than the others, talked up endlessly on the forums. It was ok but had too many issues.

 

RE: Your HELP Is Needed, posted on August 18, 2020 at 10:19:30
John Elison
Audiophile

Posts: 22780
Location: Central Kentucky
Joined: December 20, 2000
Contributor
  Since:
January 29, 2004
When Oppo players were originally introduced they were more effective than they are today. I own a BDP-105D and it works well for streaming Netflix and Pandora, as well as some other websites. Unfortunately, it doesn't have apps for most of the newer streaming sites such as QOBUZ and Amazon, etc. I don't think these apps can be installed, but I've never actually tried to do that.

Instead, I bought a FiiO M15, which I use pretty much exclusively for all my digital music needs including streaming QOBUZ. I find the little FiiO portable players to be the most convenient digital players for my purposes. The thing I like most is that they are totally autonomous and therefore have no need for a computer front-end. I use my computer only for storing my digital music files on external USB hard drives so I can copy them onto micro SD memory cards that plug directly into my FiiO digital player. After plugging in the micro SD card, the FiiO digital player becomes totally autonomous with its one-megapixel touch screen to view and select the music files I want to play. It also has WiFi connectivity so it can be loaded with any of the latest apps for streaming music from the internet.

Best regards,
John Elison

 

SSDs and hard drives, posted on August 18, 2020 at 11:00:20
Bill Way
Audiophile

Posts: 1631
Location: Toms River NJ
Joined: May 28, 2012
Contributor
  Since:
December 14, 2012
Tons of options. Check out the link for an intro.

It's good for external drives, including SSDs, to have their own power supplies, as the power available through the USB cable is often pretty limited.

SSDs are still more expensive than hard drives, but that difference gets smaller every day. Both SSDs and hard drives can handle two- or multi-channel audio with ease. Both should last virtually forever. SSDs are much faster, but both media are plenty fast for audio.

SSDs start to lose data if un-powered for more than a year, and individual memory blocks can start to fail after x-gazillion writes, but you will never approach that.

Hard drives are astonishingly reliable and typically last many years.

Both SSDs and hard drives can, rarely, fail suddenly, so keeping backups on different drives is essential.

Connect to your computer via USB (any version), Firewire, or Thunderbolt. All have plenty capacity/speed for audio, including USB-2. The big nuisance with USB is the plethora of tiny connectors that look *almost* alike but aren't.

Good luck,
WW
"They were running on fumes, dazed and confused, in a high-powered automobile."

 

RE: SSDs and hard drives, posted on August 18, 2020 at 11:37:14
pictureguy
Audiophile

Posts: 12715
Location: SoCal
Joined: October 19, 2008
I can't remember the EXACT numbers, but hard drives ARE failure prone.
They have infant mortality. It'll fail within a month or so. After that? You've got a couple years followed by a certain percentage failing each year after that.
I suspect SSD will also have the new product problem but be long=term more reliable.

I agree about USB connectors. Mini? Micro? Nano? Pseudo? Type A? Type B? I've got about a pound of those darn things around here taking up space, but I'm prepared to connect ANYTHING.
I even have a Null Modem cable around here somewhere for connection to the now-legacy serial port.
Too much is never enough

 

RE: Ditch the Oppo, posted on August 18, 2020 at 12:30:10
tketcham
Audiophile

Posts: 5790
Location: East of the 100th meridian
Joined: March 21, 2005
Contributor
  Since:
October 1, 2005
I agree with zacster about the Oppo BDP-93; it's not a good digital music player/server. The interface will leave you so frustrated you'll want to abandon streaming altogether. I tried using an Oppo 103D as a streamer and ended up turning into a door stop when I tried to update the OS to handle the latest streaming services and locked it up good. Donate the BDP-93 to a thrift store for someone to watch DVD movies.

You don't mention whether you'll be ripping CDs and purchasing hi-res downloads to build a digital music library, or strictly listening to internet streaming. If you're going to rip a bunch of CDs then a NAS drive works well and isn't that complicated to set up. Otherwise I also agree with zacster about just subscribing to a streaming service. I have a NAS library but can see eventually going to just internet streaming. One little box and a DAC; doesn't get much simpler.

I use a Bluesound Node 2i for accessing a NAS library (CD rips and hi-res downloads) and for limited internet streaming. It's fairly easy to set up and has been working great for me using an external DAC but if you're wanting to spend less money and don't mind spending more time setting up a Pi player system I could see that being a good option. There are certainly plenty of inmates here at the Asylum to help you set it up.

Tom

 

You really do not have to be concerned about all this, posted on August 18, 2020 at 15:55:45
PAR
Audiophile

Posts: 1261
Location: South London, UK
Joined: June 4, 2019
Contributor
  Since:
June 4, 2019
I guess we are of a comarable age. So let's go back to the 1960s. You wanted to hear music at home. You had three choices, radio, records or tape. You could become technically involved and build your own amplifier, speakers etc. If so you needed to acquire huge amounts of electrical and other relevant technical and scientific information. Then become aware of how that manifested itself in real life components and how they could work together and subsequently spend hours with a soldering iron and workbench.

Or you could just go to a store, buy the whole lot ready assembled and be listening that evening.

It is just the same with computer audio. However that phrase is now dated and only precisely fits one part of the hobby - that part that is a metaphor for the guys with the soldering irons on the 1960s. Virtually all of the technology that until recently required a fair amount of computing, software and hardware knowledge is now awaiting you pre-packaged in an off-the-shelf black box. Unfortunately as others have pinted out the Oppo really pre-dates this. You don't even need a computer as such.Prices range from surprisingly low to the sky is the limit.

It is great if you do want to be involved with programming a Raspberry Pi and finding out about various drives etc. and many get great enjoyment from this. But if, like me , you decide that life (or what is left of it) is too short and you just want to listen to your favourite music in great quality but by using the latest technology then just Google "streaming DACs". Just list your requirements (including budget) match the model to them and away you go.

Yes, as others point out, you don't even need a CD collection any more. Just get a streamer that provides access to, say, Qobuz and/or Tidal and you are set (with a subscription). All you need to is connect the streamer to your router and to your existing audio system. Download the control app to your phone or tablet. That's it!

"We need less, but better" - Dieter Rams

 

How deep do you want to go?, posted on August 18, 2020 at 18:18:32
Rod M
Web Geek

Posts: 12941
Location: So. California
Joined: March 1, 1999
Contributor
  Since:
March 1, 1999
I assume that you have a PC, so the first thing to do is to rip your CD collection to a hard disk. If you system has a couple TB, then it may have plenty of room. dbPowerAmp seems to be the best choice. You can use it free for 30 days and it's only $39 to buy it which is worth it.

As for a USB drive, it seems that you would have to buy an enclusure and a HD if you only want 2TB. Seagate doesn't have external drives with power supplies until you hit 4TB which are cheap enough. You should buy two so that you can backup one to another.

Another option is a NAS. Some, like Synology, can also run the server function instead of using your PC as a server. You still should have a USB drive for backup of your library.

Most people would use Logitech Media Server software which is free and works. Roon and others are more complicated, but do more.

So, once you have CDs ripped and available via a server, you need a streamer to play the music. There are lots of options, many fairly expensive and some that have their own server GUI and all that. The most economical and good performing would the RPi 4 or a Logitech Touch. The RPi would require an external DAC and is cheap, about $80 with case. But it does require some computer savvy and familiarity with Linux is quite helpful. The Touch is pretty much plug and play and has it's own DAC; however, it does sound better with a good DAC. The RPi has to be used with a smart phone. The Touch has it's own touch screen that you can use or use it via a smart phone which will also sync with an RPi for music in different rooms. Most feel the RPi sounds a little better. It's close. I have both and actually have an extra Touch laying around if you wanted one as they haven't been made for a while.

-Rod

 

RE: Your HELP Is Needed, posted on August 18, 2020 at 18:34:10
LtMandella
Audiophile

Posts: 735
Location: CA
Joined: May 27, 2019
IMHO the first thing you should do is read a beginners book on how computers work. And a very light introduction to networking concepts.

IF you suck it up and make the small effort to do those two things, your future life using computer technology to play music will be VASTLY less frustrating over your lifetime.

Vastly.


sex after 70 is like trying to play pool with a rope

 

I have 5 backups...., posted on August 18, 2020 at 20:25:24
Rod M
Web Geek

Posts: 12941
Location: So. California
Joined: March 1, 1999
Contributor
  Since:
March 1, 1999
I haven't gone as far as taking one to the bank safety deposit box.

SSDs are faster and likely more reliable for a longer time for the main server, but in reality, music serving is far slower than the slowest drive, so HDs and even usb drives are plenty fast enough.

Using USB cases is something that I like as you can plug in any drive.

-Rod

 

RE: Your HELP Is Needed, posted on August 18, 2020 at 22:05:22
thetubeguy1954
Audiophile

Posts: 5854
Location: Orlando, Fla
Joined: January 7, 2001
Hi LtMandella! If you read my reply to soundchekk down below you'll notice I said; "About fifteen years ago I was a PC Tech who helped the LAN Admin during my downtime." But IMHO working with all these Computer Music programs, like Jriver and learning about Music Servers, Caching Music Servers, NAS, Music Streamers and pretty much everything else about Computer Audio, is nothing like anything I was doing when working at the insurance company repairing their computers, running virus scans and installing & troubleshooting their programs. So yes I have a pretty good idea of how PCs work and what basic networking concepts are. That said, I do appreciate the time you took to provide me with your insight...



Thetubeguy1954 (Tom)

Central Florida Audio Society -- SETriodes Group -- Space Coast Audio Society
Full-range/Wide-range Drivers --- Front & Back-Loaded Horns --- High Sensitivity Speakers


 

RE: How deep do you want to go?, posted on August 18, 2020 at 22:23:51
thetubeguy1954
Audiophile

Posts: 5854
Location: Orlando, Fla
Joined: January 7, 2001
Hey Rod! Longtime no see. I want to get into Computer Audio slowly and correctly. My reasoning behind doing it slowly is being able to actually learn what I'm doing while doing whatever task I'm doing. A friend recently updated to a nice Aurender unit so he's going to be selling me a small audio PC he was previously using for only $100 that uses JRiver and is already loaded with a lot of nice music.

What I'm really going to need to learn is how to use Jriver and learn to rip my entire CD collection onto this PC. In case you were wondering I was going to use the OPPO in the meantime because a friend gave it to me. The reason I needed the 2TB HD, was so the friend who gave me the OPPO could load a bunch of music on it from another 2TB he was using with the OPPO that's dying. Plus I figured it couldn't hurt to use the OPPO and try and learn some things about Computer Audio while waiting to get the small PC from my other friend.

So knowing all this how would you suggest I proceed?



Thetubeguy1954 (Tom)

Central Florida Audio Society -- SETriodes Group -- Space Coast Audio Society
Full-range/Wide-range Drivers --- Front & Back-Loaded Horns --- High Sensitivity Speakers


 

I'll second that!, posted on August 18, 2020 at 22:55:02
Goober58
Audiophile

Posts: 1412
Joined: November 15, 2016
My first attempt at integrating a HDD into my system, after running a cable from the PC, was based on using an OPPO. Cost me $1200, the interface stunk and I didn't think the DAC sounded very good.

Now I've got a Raspberry PI ($100 or so with a nice case) to which I attach a HDD and my DAC. The SW I use to select music is on my iPhone and on my personal computer. The GUI isn't perfect but supports various ways to look at the collection, has been reliable and is fun/easy to use. It also sounds better than both my CD players.

I do free lossless downloads, rip CDs and digitize vinyl LPs for my HDD.

 

RE: How deep do you want to go?, posted on August 19, 2020 at 02:08:48
Roseval
Audiophile

Posts: 1727
Joined: March 31, 2008
learn to rip my entire CD collection onto this PC

Have a good look at dBpoweramp.
JRiver don't support Accuraterip and its metadata leaves a lot to be desired for.
https://www.thewelltemperedcomputer.com/SW/ripping.html

As the Oppo can't drive external HD's, try a (micro)SD with a USB adapter if you have one around.
A good alternative is to connect it to the network.
You can make it see the audio e.g. on your PC.
As audio PC is on its way, I wouldn't spend much money on the Oppo.
The next question will probably by how to connect the PC to the stereo.
I recommend a good USB DAC e.g. RME ADI-2
https://www.audiosciencereview.com/forum/index.php?threads/rme-adi-2-fs-version-2-dac-and-headphone-amp-review.13379/

Maybe my website is of use as it covers the basics of using a PC for playback.

The Well Tempered Computer

 

RE: Your HELP Is Needed, posted on August 19, 2020 at 08:38:25
Jim Smith
Industry Professional

Posts: 1091
Location: Atlanta, GA area
Joined: April 5, 2000
Contributor
  Since:
June 17, 2000
Tom,

Have you checked with Mike Bovaird?

Best regards,

Jim Smith

 

RE: You really do not have to be concerned about all this, posted on August 19, 2020 at 09:41:24
E-Stat
Audiophile

Posts: 29721
Joined: May 12, 2000
Contributor
  Since:
April 5, 2002
Yes, as others point out, you don't even need a CD collection any more. Just get a streamer that provides access to, say, Qobuz and/or Tidal and you are set (with a subscription).

Only if that were truly the case. I have lots of titles not found on either service. I currently subscribe to Qobuz Studio.

 

RE: You really do not have to be concerned about all this, posted on August 19, 2020 at 09:43:14
thetubeguy1954
Audiophile

Posts: 5854
Location: Orlando, Fla
Joined: January 7, 2001
Quite honestly, I'd like to be able to click on a tablet, see the CDs I have, and then select play to listen to what I want to hear as simply and easily as I possibly can. This is exactly what I'd like to learn how to do...



Thetubeguy1954 (Tom)

Central Florida Audio Society -- SETriodes Group -- Space Coast Audio Society
Full-range/Wide-range Drivers --- Front & Back-Loaded Horns --- High Sensitivity Speakers


 

There are alternatives..., posted on August 19, 2020 at 09:50:06
E-Stat
Audiophile

Posts: 29721
Joined: May 12, 2000
Contributor
  Since:
April 5, 2002
I haven't gone as far as taking one to the bank safety deposit box.

My world including video and other documents neatly fits in 2 TB. I maintain three offline 2 TB USB drives to supplement the mirrored drive on the NAS. One is rotated periodically to wifey's office at the university which is sprinkler protected against fire. I also have a small family of smaller capacity drives that I once used for primary backup.

My music library actually fits on a 400 GB microSD card. I have one currently maintained - just because!

 

RE: Your HELP Is Needed, posted on August 19, 2020 at 09:54:30
thetubeguy1954
Audiophile

Posts: 5854
Location: Orlando, Fla
Joined: January 7, 2001
Jim, can you tell me who Mike Bovaird is --{is it the Mike of Suncoast Audio}--- how I'd contact him, or better yet why I'd be doing so?







Thetubeguy1954 (Tom)

Central Florida Audio Society -- SETriodes Group -- Space Coast Audio Society
Full-range/Wide-range Drivers --- Front & Back-Loaded Horns --- High Sensitivity Speakers


 

There are many ways to achieve that, posted on August 19, 2020 at 10:03:10
E-Stat
Audiophile

Posts: 29721
Joined: May 12, 2000
Contributor
  Since:
April 5, 2002
There are a range of choices from free server software like Logitech Media Server (LMS) to metadata rich Roon which does cost a bit. Here's my view using iPeng app on iPad:



You can select content from your library in a number of different ways or simply use the search tool. Build a playlist on the fly. Save them. Select by album. Or, have the player randomly walk through your library. I've rediscovered some old friends that way!

I also subscribe to Qobuz so that and the world of internet radio are other choices. Albums or tracks you have designated as "favorites" on Qobuz appear as though they are stored in your library.

 

RE: Your HELP Is Needed, posted on August 19, 2020 at 10:11:39
Jim Smith
Industry Professional

Posts: 1091
Location: Atlanta, GA area
Joined: April 5, 2000
Contributor
  Since:
June 17, 2000
Mike is AudioShark.org and Suncoast Audio.

He is the most helpful dealer of which I am aware. Plus, he knows computer audio inside & out.

Best regards,

Jim Smith

 

RE: Your HELP Is Needed, posted on August 19, 2020 at 10:17:33
thetubeguy1954
Audiophile

Posts: 5854
Location: Orlando, Fla
Joined: January 7, 2001
Thanks, Jim...




Thetubeguy1954 (Tom)

Central Florida Audio Society -- SETriodes Group -- Space Coast Audio Society
Full-range/Wide-range Drivers --- Front & Back-Loaded Horns --- High Sensitivity Speakers


 

RE: How deep do you want to go?, posted on August 19, 2020 at 10:22:43
thetubeguy1954
Audiophile

Posts: 5854
Location: Orlando, Fla
Joined: January 7, 2001
Thanks for all your advice and after a quick perusal, I'll definitely be reading your website! Thanks again...



Thetubeguy1954 (Tom)

Central Florida Audio Society -- SETriodes Group -- Space Coast Audio Society
Full-range/Wide-range Drivers --- Front & Back-Loaded Horns --- High Sensitivity Speakers


 

RE: How deep do you want to go?, posted on August 19, 2020 at 10:22:43
Rod M
Web Geek

Posts: 12941
Location: So. California
Joined: March 1, 1999
Contributor
  Since:
March 1, 1999
If you're getting an audio PC for $100, it should be good enough for your music server. All you need is wired ethernet connection or a good WiFi connection. JRiver is a love/hate sort of thing. I never used it, but some around here might swear by it or at it. I would imagine that the audio PC has enough space to add your collection to it.

Using the Oppo as a player should work. It will be more of a file type UI, so you'll probably want a more modern streamer device like an RPi or Touch or one of many more with various advantages or disadvantages.

The only way to move forward is to get your toes in the water and before you know it you'll be swimming like a champ.

-Rod

 

RE: How deep do you want to go?, posted on August 19, 2020 at 10:25:16
thetubeguy1954
Audiophile

Posts: 5854
Location: Orlando, Fla
Joined: January 7, 2001
Thanks again Rod! It's nice to have a place like Audio Asylum to be able to come to with all my Computer Audio questions...



Thetubeguy1954 (Tom)

Central Florida Audio Society -- SETriodes Group -- Space Coast Audio Society
Full-range/Wide-range Drivers --- Front & Back-Loaded Horns --- High Sensitivity Speakers


 

RE: You really do not have to be concerned about all this, posted on August 19, 2020 at 14:06:59
PAR
Audiophile

Posts: 1261
Location: South London, UK
Joined: June 4, 2019
Contributor
  Since:
June 4, 2019
" I'd like to be able to click on a tablet, see the CDs I have, and then select play to listen to what I want to hear as simply and easily as I possibly can."

A type of simple solution is linked for your interest. This is only an example and it may or may not exactly suit your needs and budget (this one is fairly expensive). I just selected it as I know from personal experience how excellent the Melco streamers/servers are and the publicity flyer linked does show how straightforward it can be. Of course there are numerous alternatives at various price points.

As you want to access your own CDs then you will need to rip them to its (or an alternative's) storage. All you need is a piece of software such as dbpoweramp downloaded to your PC. You will need an optical drive, I use a cheap external USB one from LG. Just insert the CD and the software will automatically find all of the metadata and artwork. You check it (edit f required)then press "Rip". This process does not happen in real time so a few minutes later all will be done.

You will need a USB DAC but this requirement is going to be a common factor for virtually any route that you choose.Loads of alternatives again at various price and quality points.

I note that you have referred to the subject of backups elsewhere. Essential of course and a copy held offsite is needed in the case of burglary or fire or flood.I used to lodge one with a friend but I found that my additions to the dtatabase occured nore frequently than how often I saw him. So I now use cloud storage for the offsite backup.

I hope that is of some help.
"We need less, but better" - Dieter Rams

 

RE: You really do not have to be concerned about all this, posted on August 19, 2020 at 14:16:06
PAR
Audiophile

Posts: 1261
Location: South London, UK
Joined: June 4, 2019
Contributor
  Since:
June 4, 2019
OK I am guilty of exaggeration in the service of encouragement.

But it depends to a great extent on what your record collection is and in what esteem it is held. Many people are now streaming for the great majority of their musical entertainment needs. Me? Mostly streaming, however even my LP collection is still not fully available on silver disc after 37 years. And I daresay people were hanging on to their 78s as the repertoire never made it to LP. The margins will always be there I expect.

"We need less, but better" - Dieter Rams

 

RE: There are many ways to achieve that, posted on August 19, 2020 at 17:39:36
zacster
Audiophile

Posts: 1570
Location: NYC
Joined: November 22, 2003
But the thing is that you still have to rip your cds to a hard drive and that takes a considerable amount of time. I subscribed to Qobuz and never looked at my cd collection again.

 

RE: I'll second that!, posted on August 19, 2020 at 17:51:20
zacster
Audiophile

Posts: 1570
Location: NYC
Joined: November 22, 2003
Yea. Spend your money on the analog side, not on digital. It has gotten so cheap With digital to get sound that is better than your analog gear could ever hope to sound. I just bought a Topping E30 DAC and it blows away every DAC I ever had and it cost $100 used or $129 new. I'm on vacation now and brought it with me along with a small SMSL amp and small speakers and it sounds phenomenal. I plug my phone in and play Qobuz hi-res with a choice of music too large to consider ripping.

 

If that works for you... -nt, posted on August 20, 2020 at 05:34:22
E-Stat
Audiophile

Posts: 29721
Joined: May 12, 2000
Contributor
  Since:
April 5, 2002

 

RE: You really do not have to be concerned about all this, posted on August 22, 2020 at 16:16:24
zacster
Audiophile

Posts: 1570
Location: NYC
Joined: November 22, 2003
I made playlists of the top 1043 classic rock songs of all time (104.3 FM in NYC sponsors this each Thanksgiving weekend). Of those 1000+ songs only the music from Bob Seger was not available anywhere on Qobuz.

Now classic rock might not be your thing or your only thing, it isn't mine either, but that's a pretty damn good hit rate. On top of that at least 50% of the titles are in a hi-res format. This is of course because these were mostly recorded in analog and remastered for first CD then DVD-A or SACD and online sales.

I'm sure there are rare classical recordings out there on vinyl, but I would venture to say that a lot of CD is available because the only sales/royalty life left on them is streaming.

I'm not into esoteric music, nor those bands that may have produced 100 copies of a live performance on LP. There is so much to explore on the streaming services that you may never listen to those records again anyway. And nothing is stopping you from popping it into a turntable or CD player. My experience is that you never will.

 

RE: You really do not have to be concerned about all this, posted on August 23, 2020 at 02:49:12
PAR
Audiophile

Posts: 1261
Location: South London, UK
Joined: June 4, 2019
Contributor
  Since:
June 4, 2019
I agree with just about everything you say. Streaming music is a fabulous resource. However not everything is available but I think it worth remembering that it is also a pretty new format ( Qobuz USA are only just into their second year) so their catalogues are ever expanding with many gaps being filled as time goes by.

Nevertheless I do know of companies who have taken the decision to never allow their titles to be streamed. Unfortunately for my music interests that includes one of the most important labels in classical music (nearly all new classical music now comes from independents). I have spoken with their CEO and he has solid economic reasons for this decision. I just hope that the increasing penetration and value of streaming to the recording industry may eventually serve to change his mind.

"We need less, but better" - Dieter Rams

 

RE: You really do not have to be concerned about all this, posted on August 23, 2020 at 07:43:15
zacster
Audiophile

Posts: 1570
Location: NYC
Joined: November 22, 2003
Which classical label is that? I listen to classical but haven't paid attention to the labels.

 

RE: You really do not have to be concerned about all this, posted on August 23, 2020 at 08:43:12
PAR
Audiophile

Posts: 1261
Location: South London, UK
Joined: June 4, 2019
Contributor
  Since:
June 4, 2019
Hyperion.

One of the most innovative of the independent classical labels who have built a large and impressive catalogue over the years and continue with a regular diverse monthly release schedule.


"We need less, but better" - Dieter Rams

 

RE: There are many ways to achieve that, posted on August 24, 2020 at 15:07:41
thetubeguy1954
Audiophile

Posts: 5854
Location: Orlando, Fla
Joined: January 7, 2001
Hi E-Stat!

That's exactly how I want my display to look like! Thanks for showing that to me...





Thetubeguy1954 (Tom)

Central Florida Audio Society -- SETriodes Group -- Space Coast Audio Society
Full-range/Wide-range Drivers --- Front & Back-Loaded Horns --- High Sensitivity Speakers


 

RE: You really do not have to be concerned about all this, posted on August 24, 2020 at 15:21:06
thetubeguy1954
Audiophile

Posts: 5854
Location: Orlando, Fla
Joined: January 7, 2001
E-Stat that's exactly what I've heard, I wonder if the jazz band Continuum and their CD "Continuum" or Bill Cunliffe's jazzy "Paul Simon Songbook" is listed on these sites, or the Prog-rock CDs such as Aorta's "Aorta" and Fireballet's ""Night On Bald Mountain"" these are some CDs I just couldn't live without...



Thetubeguy1954 (Tom)

Central Florida Audio Society -- SETriodes Group -- Space Coast Audio Society
Full-range/Wide-range Drivers --- Front & Back-Loaded Horns --- High Sensitivity Speakers


 

RE: Ditch the Oppo, posted on August 24, 2020 at 15:30:17
thetubeguy1954
Audiophile

Posts: 5854
Location: Orlando, Fla
Joined: January 7, 2001
Hi tketcham! I'm actually very selective about the music I enjoy listening to. In fact, I can love one CD by a group, hate their next CD entirely and like about 50% of their next CD So I want to combine ripping my CDs and purchasing hi-res downloads with listening to internet streaming! I think that sounds like the best way to go, for me...



Thetubeguy1954 (Tom)

Central Florida Audio Society -- SETriodes Group -- Space Coast Audio Society
Full-range/Wide-range Drivers --- Front & Back-Loaded Horns --- High Sensitivity Speakers


 

RE: Ditch the Oppo, posted on August 24, 2020 at 19:19:27
tketcham
Audiophile

Posts: 5790
Location: East of the 100th meridian
Joined: March 21, 2005
Contributor
  Since:
October 1, 2005
I've ripped about 1250 CDs, have purchased around 200 hi-res albums so far, and have been gradually recording LPs to add to my digital library. I have to admit that it's nice at times to be able to just sit down, call up an album on the smartphone, and play music. I still enjoy playing record albums and CDs when I have a block of time but the convenience of digital music files is inescapable.

As for the Bluesound Node 2i and BluOS controller, it's been a pleasure to use and listen to. It was a fairly easy and affordable way for me to get into digital streaming. The NAS drive was an added expense but well worth it. Storing, managing and playing digital music off the NAS drive is easy, quick, and sounds great.

Have fun!
Tom

 

RE: I'll second that!, posted on August 24, 2020 at 19:36:14
tketcham
Audiophile

Posts: 5790
Location: East of the 100th meridian
Joined: March 21, 2005
Contributor
  Since:
October 1, 2005
I purchased some hi-res albums (24-96 to 24-192) that I already have on vinyl and then compared them to my LP recordings (24-192) and I have to say the LP recordings are quite good. My experience has been (so far) that a good 24-96 (or better) digital album can sound better than a Redbook CD version, but not always. So much of it depends on the source, mixing, and mastering.

Tom

 

RE: You really do not have to be concerned about all this, posted on August 25, 2020 at 05:56:01
zacster
Audiophile

Posts: 1570
Location: NYC
Joined: November 22, 2003



On Qobuz I couldn't find Continuum, but there are lots of bands with that name. Bill Cunliffe is out there but I didn't see "Paul Simon Songbook". Both Aorta and Fireballet are there, and even better both are in hi-res 24/96 which surprised even me. This is typical that rock is there but jazz is a lot more spotty as a lot of it wasn't widely distributed in the first place.

As I've stated alreaedy in another post though, there is nothing stopping you from playing your CD of something not on Qobuz. But also, you'll spend so much time on new music you won't want to except on a rare occasion.

 

RE: I'll second that!, posted on August 25, 2020 at 11:55:23
Goober58
Audiophile

Posts: 1412
Joined: November 15, 2016
The CD rips and free lossless downloads I get are really good via the rpi/hdd transport. I tempted to get rid of all my CDPs.

The vinyl recordings can be excellent but setting gain levels is a PITA - it's as easy to not get it to the right level as it is to not get both channels at equal levels. Means at playback I'm always adjusting volume with the vinyl and that sucks because randomizing playback is such a blast. Worse than that is I don't have a balance control which seems much more needed now that I decided to make recordings of vinyl.

What's neat about the vinyl recordings is that I can identify whether I used the XX2 or the 20xl and whether they were mounted on the Roksan or the Rega.

I've used a Sony CDR and a Tascam CDR for the bulk of my recordings. Given my ability as a recordist it would probably would have been a waste of money have used more enlightened equipment.


 

RE: Vinyl recordings can be fixed, posted on August 25, 2020 at 13:48:48
tketcham
Audiophile

Posts: 5790
Location: East of the 100th meridian
Joined: March 21, 2005
Contributor
  Since:
October 1, 2005
Using a CD recorder can be a bit of a pain. I used to have a Pioneer PDR-509 recorder but gave it away. I now have a Tascam digital recorder and use a fairly conservative recording level for all my LPs so I don't end up with clipping. But then I use Audacity to Normalize the recordings to a -1dB amplitude level. You can also even out mismatched channels. If there are a few extreme peaks in a recording that restrict the amount of amplitude adjustment I first use Loudness Normalization to bring the peaks down in amplitude to allow more headroom for the normalizing process. So now I can play my LP recordings at about the same level as CD rips and Hi-Res files.

Tom

 

RE: Vinyl recordings can be fixed, posted on August 25, 2020 at 14:26:21
Goober58
Audiophile

Posts: 1412
Joined: November 15, 2016
Thanks! I use Audacity to set and label tracks so I'll check out normalizing volume with my next batch of recordings.

 

RE: Vinyl recordings can be fixed, posted on August 25, 2020 at 16:12:25
zacster
Audiophile

Posts: 1570
Location: NYC
Joined: November 22, 2003
I did a few vinyl rips a number of years ago and when I listen to them now they sound bad. It was before I started tweaking my turntable and I can hear every flaw. Playing the same records now sounds better on the TT, and I've also tried the streamed versions and still think the LP sounds a hair better.

 

RE: You really do not have to be concerned about all this, posted on August 28, 2020 at 02:12:12
thetubeguy1954
Audiophile

Posts: 5854
Location: Orlando, Fla
Joined: January 7, 2001
Thanks, PAR! This is exactly the type of ease in playback that I'm talking about! Oh yeah, and I love the backup copy in the cloud suggestion!



Thetubeguy1954 (Tom)

Central Florida Audio Society -- SETriodes Group -- Space Coast Audio Society
Full-range/Wide-range Drivers --- Front & Back-Loaded Horns --- High Sensitivity Speakers


 

RE: You really do not have to be concerned about all this, posted on August 28, 2020 at 02:16:11
thetubeguy1954
Audiophile

Posts: 5854
Location: Orlando, Fla
Joined: January 7, 2001
Thanks, Zacster! That's the Fireballet recording I was speaking about. I have to admit to being a bit surprised that and Aorta were both listed...



Thetubeguy1954 (Tom)

Central Florida Audio Society -- SETriodes Group -- Space Coast Audio Society
Full-range/Wide-range Drivers --- Front & Back-Loaded Horns --- High Sensitivity Speakers


 

RE: Your HELP Is Needed, posted on September 14, 2020 at 16:25:55
zacster
Audiophile

Posts: 1570
Location: NYC
Joined: November 22, 2003
At this point in the evolution of computer audio I'd skip the storage altogether and just go with a streaming service. Yes there is a monthly fee but if you by even one cd a month that will pay for it. You already have a computer and internet service I assume and likely home WiFi too and with that you really only need a device to act as a receiver and a cheap raspberry pi can do that. You plug the DAC into the pi USB port and that is the only physical connection needed. You need software on the pi and the computer but even that is easy enough. You'll have plenty of help here if you go that route.

I have an Oppo 93 myself and I don't see how that would even fit in. I never use mine anymore as I don't play discs of any type anymore. If your friend is suggesting it as a front end it is a rather poor one. The remote is so slow as to be useless. It was one of those internet hyped devices that was supposed to be better than the others, talked up endlessly on the forums. It was ok but had too many issues.

 

RE: Your HELP Is Needed, posted on September 17, 2020 at 14:36:23
zacster
Audiophile

Posts: 1570
Location: NYC
Joined: November 22, 2003
At this point in the evolution of computer audio I'd skip the storage altogether and just go with a streaming service. Yes there is a monthly fee but if you by even one cd a month that will pay for it. You already have a computer and internet service I assume and likely home WiFi too and with that you really only need a device to act as a receiver and a cheap raspberry pi can do that. You plug the DAC into the pi USB port and that is the only physical connection needed. You need software on the pi and the computer but even that is easy enough. You'll have plenty of help here if you go that route.

I have an Oppo 93 myself and I don't see how that would even fit in. I never use mine anymore as I don't play discs of any type anymore. If your friend is suggesting it as a front end it is a rather poor one. The remote is so slow as to be useless. It was one of those internet hyped devices that was supposed to be better than the others, talked up endlessly on the forums. It was ok but had too many issues.

 

RE: Your HELP Is Needed, posted on September 19, 2020 at 19:00:52
zacster
Audiophile

Posts: 1570
Location: NYC
Joined: November 22, 2003
At this point in the evolution of computer audio I'd skip the storage altogether and just go with a streaming service. Yes there is a monthly fee but if you by even one cd a month that will pay for it. You already have a computer and internet service I assume and likely home WiFi too and with that you really only need a device to act as a receiver and a cheap raspberry pi can do that. You plug the DAC into the pi USB port and that is the only physical connection needed. You need software on the pi and the computer but even that is easy enough. You'll have plenty of help here if you go that route.

I have an Oppo 93 myself and I don't see how that would even fit in. I never use mine anymore as I don't play discs of any type anymore. If your friend is suggesting it as a front end it is a rather poor one. The remote is so slow as to be useless. It was one of those internet hyped devices that was supposed to be better than the others, talked up endlessly on the forums. It was ok but had too many issues.

 

Page processed in 0.049 seconds.