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What is MQA ?

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Posted on January 6, 2017 at 05:19:49
akltam
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Sorry for my ignorance.

Alan

 

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RE: What is MQA ? , posted on January 6, 2017 at 07:22:07
PAR
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1. It is a way of storing and transmitting high resolution audio data within a standard resolution audio stream.

2. It is a way of doing this so that the audio stream remains compatible with a replay sytem that does not have the ability to decode MQA (although the hi-rez information will not then be available).

3. It corrects abberations caused by the ADC encoding and DAC decoding digital filters.

4. It allows the proprietor of the original recording to validate the recording that is stored or transmitted.

These are MQA's claims I believe. I understand that there is a small loss in bit depth (24 bits becomes effective 22 or 23 bits) when decoded. However it seems that this is probably inconsequential when listening, particularly as a practical audio system with true 24 bit capability i.e. S/N ratio of 144dB, would be unusual especially if ambient room noise is accounted for.

 

RE: What is MQA ? , posted on January 6, 2017 at 12:49:05
ahendler
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You are absolutely correct
Alan

 

RE: What is MQA ? , posted on January 8, 2017 at 10:28:47
Roseval
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"1. It is a way of storing and transmitting high resolution audio data within a standard resolution audio stream."

Maybe stating the obvious but this means it is lossy compression, say a kind of highres MP3

The Well Tempered Computer

 

So, to your mind, what would you rather listen to?, posted on January 8, 2017 at 15:05:01
Ivan303
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16/44.1
20/96
24/48

I'll take 20/96K over 24/48K any day.

Bits 21 through 24 don't do much for me.





 

RE: What is MQA ? , posted on January 8, 2017 at 15:39:47
PAR
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Yes it is lossy. However the important point is whether or not the loss is significant to a listener. After all, all known music recording systems are lossy in one way or another.

Highres MP3? Although there is some perceptual coding involved this is not the basis of the invention which depends upon the fact that for audio there is, in effect, no significant audio data (if any at all) related to the final few bits of a 24 bit word which are therefore available for other uses. At least that's how I understand it.


 

And you would understand correctly..., posted on January 8, 2017 at 16:28:33
Ivan303
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At least that is the claim.

Bit 24 is important only if one desires to record and play back 'Brownian Motion'. ;-)

OK, 24 bits is equal to a S/N of 144dB. My DAC is limited to about >120dB which is about 21 bits so I'm could be perfectly happy with bit depth of 18-20 bits.

That's if I can have a sampling rate of 96KHz as a trade off just for giving up 4 bits I have no practical use for.






 

RE: And you would understand correctly..., posted on January 8, 2017 at 20:31:39
PAR
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Absolutely agree. Even if we did have a system delivering 144dB dynamic range I don't think that we have a 144dB range hearing system to take advantage of it. Once again the audio industry is indulging in a numbers game without amy practical meaning viz. 1970's mass market amps and what was called "specmanship". BTW, I have seen reference to 32 bit audio. Huh.



 

RE: And you would understand correctly..., posted on January 9, 2017 at 14:21:56
ahendler
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Also you can't get 144db signal to noise in a recording studio. The best dacs no matter what they say do only 18 to 20 bits
Alan

 

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