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Why we are audiophiles....

76.25.11.220

Posted on January 4, 2017 at 21:00:55
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...partial explanation here, in an oblique way. We like to stimulate our brains with music; the song they play here sounds, to me, like early Pink Floyd, actually.

 

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RE: Why we are audiophiles...., posted on January 4, 2017 at 22:23:04
fantja
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For me, the Love of Music.

 

RE: Why we are audiophiles...., posted on January 5, 2017 at 02:00:29
4everyoung
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Has anyone checked out the healing frequencies? This is one website of many...






 

RE: Why we are audiophiles...., posted on January 5, 2017 at 04:29:54
Al the Vegan
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Here's a good example of 432Hz tuning, I do find all the songs 'uplifting'





 

RE: Why we are audiophiles...., posted on January 5, 2017 at 05:08:41
BillH
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I don't know about you, but I am an audiophile because it's a chick magnet. LOL!

 

For the Music, posted on January 5, 2017 at 06:07:59
briggs
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I have a great love of music and little talent for playing it. I started along the path to becoming an audiophile when a teacher suggested that my best instrument might be a record player.

 

RE: For the Music, posted on January 5, 2017 at 07:01:45
krankkall
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Being a third-rate guitarist for 50 years, makes me appreciate people with actual talent!

Steve

 

RE: Why we are audiophiles...., posted on January 5, 2017 at 07:40:43
Tweaker456
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Did they cure you of your audiophilia Sue?
"The Borg is the ultimate user. They're unlike any threat your Federation has ever faced."

- Q, 2365

 

Self-medicating?, posted on January 5, 2017 at 10:36:05
mkuller
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...for some, perhaps - I won't mention any names

I've always loved music as long as I can remember and being an audiophile lets me get closer to it.

Sure it affects my moods and can relax me or give me energy but I never considered that to be my motivation.

 

somewhat of a meditation, posted on January 5, 2017 at 10:41:56
bullethead
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meditation, somewhat. There's tons of great music out there to calm you down, ambient, jazz, classical piano.

medication for the soul really, sure you get high from it, is that bad really?

 

RE: Why we are audiophiles...., posted on January 5, 2017 at 10:42:10
mkuller
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...it's always worked for me :-)

 

RE: somewhat of a meditation, posted on January 5, 2017 at 10:43:12
mkuller
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...bad?

Not at all - much better than the alternatives - pizza and beer :-)

 

RE: Why we are audiophiles...., posted on January 5, 2017 at 10:50:36
4everyoung
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>>Did they cure you of your audiophilia Sue?<<

Gave me a headache.

Here's my coming home music. There really is light at the end of the tunnel. You just have to let it in.





 

Note, posted on January 5, 2017 at 12:13:18
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The original post wasn't a question of why we are audiophiles, but rather a statement of why we are audiophile, with the answer being that listening to music affects our brain, as can be seen with neuroimaging. The statements, "Because I love music" or "Music gives me a kind of high" or "For self-medication" are all acknowledgements that music affects our brains positively, probably through what's called the "dopamine reward pathway" (among other systems). And, as some have indicated, males looking at evocative photos has the same effect.

Ultimately, we are audiophiles because music affects us (our brains) in a positive way.

 

RE: Why we are audiophiles...., posted on January 5, 2017 at 14:05:45
fantja
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Hubba, hubba

 

RE: Note, posted on January 5, 2017 at 14:37:46
BillH
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Oh yeah, that. It's true. The New York Philharmonic's New Year's Eve concert this year brought me such joy that I almost contributed to my local PBS affiliate station. I may do it yet.

 

What about other pastimes?, posted on January 5, 2017 at 15:13:35
mkuller
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...so do you think that's the explanation of why people have other hobbies as well?

Say golf, boating, restoring autos, bicycling, painting, etc.

 

RE: Why we are audiophiles...., posted on January 5, 2017 at 15:19:24
Tweaker456
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Looks like extremely expensive equipment.
"The Borg is the ultimate user. They're unlike any threat your Federation has ever faced."

- Q, 2365

 

High maintenance, no doubt...(nt), posted on January 5, 2017 at 15:33:52
mkuller
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(nt)

 

That YouTube clip reminds me of Brian Eno's ambient albums, posted on January 5, 2017 at 16:00:44
Dave_K
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December 0, 0000





 

RE: What about other pastimes?, posted on January 5, 2017 at 17:59:19
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Absolutely. Anything you do that you find rewarding (i.e., you love it) stimulates the dopamine reward pathway, which is one reason you continue to do it. These days, the best example is the little rush of dopamine kids (and adults) get from texting and social media....very addicting, with all the classical characteristics of any addiction.

 

RE: Why we are audiophiles...., posted on January 6, 2017 at 03:07:57
Disbeliever
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Incredible Pink Floyd whilst amusing is what I call Shit music in Dark side of the Moon it virtually starts off saying Fuck. This is not a reason for being an audiophile'

 

RE: Note, posted on January 6, 2017 at 04:32:41
wazoo
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...probably through what's called the "dopamine reward pathway"

Probably? That's common to all addiction and I confess to being a music junkie. On the other hand, I disagree with Pinker, who refers to music as 'auditory cheesecake'. Bone flutes and other simple devices with which to make music are among the oldest artifacts in our museums. Tone singing could well predate proper language. Language and music may share neuro-networks, but I don't think we can deduce from that, as Pinker does, that music is just our brain's applying those networks to entertain itself. It's even beneficial to learn to play an instrument and read music. Doing so drives morphological changes in those networks which enhance our linguistic skills.

Music is certainly a drug, of sorts, but it is much more. The sweeping emotional power of music is incredible. It relaxes me and brings me joy and certain music makes me cry. In all cultures, music is a companion to the three Fs - we use it to woo, to travel and to motivate us in battle. It's important. It drives us. It can even give cadence to the gait of a Parkinson's patient (further supporting the connection to dopamine). It can draw memories from individuals with senile dementia. It is life.

If you aren't familiar with Rachel Flowers, I think you should check out some youtube videos of her playing. She has been blind since birth, essentially. That leaves nearly a third of her cortex without the task it would normally perform, but the brain's plasticity puts that computing power to other uses. She has an auditory and musical super-brain. Once she was exposed to music (early in her life, fortunately) it began remodeling her brain. Wouldn't you love to image her brain while she is playing, or just imagining herself playing, an instrument?


 

RE: Why we are audiophiles...., posted on January 6, 2017 at 05:07:43
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Different music for different people....but the effect on the brain is the same.

 

RE: Note, posted on January 6, 2017 at 05:09:47
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Hey Wazoo! Long time, no hear. I said "probably" as the scientist in me always hedges a bit. If we want to be more accurate, we should say, "the dopamine anticipation of reward pathway".

Rachel Flowers certainly has "music in her brain." You know, I still watch good musicians and, even though I know the neural mechanisms behind what they do, I still have to wonder how they do it. It boggle my brain.


Happy new year!

 

The birds? What are they doing in there?, posted on January 6, 2017 at 06:42:59
Frihed89
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They drive me crazy.

 

anticipation of reward, posted on January 6, 2017 at 08:03:05
wazoo
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You know; that bites audiophiles in the butt from time to time. ;-)

I was amazed enough at Rachel's ability to convince me that I was listening to Keith Emerson when I closed my eyes, but to do the same with Frank Zappa after a mere two years of playing the guitar just makes her prowess all the more mind boggling. At/near the top of the comments of the first video I saw of her playing on stage with Dweezil, someone mentioned that it's unfair. That's really why I mentioned it to you, because I don't think it's unfair at all - at least to some extent, she pays for her incredible talent by living without vision. I think it would be fascinating to see just how differently her brain is structured and something tells me that she'd be only too happy to participate in a little study.

Happy New Year.

Lately, I've been bumping up against the other side of neuroplasticity, specifically the changes in our brains that affect how we hear phonemes, or, rather, don't hear (at least, attend to) those to which we aren't exposed by age seven. For the last couple of years, I've been more and more enchanted by other languages and I not only enjoy listening to music from other parts of the world, but I also thrill at the challenge of learning the words and singing along (not that I'm much of a singer). Recently, I've been focusing on a few Finnish songs - words like liinahapaijan are bloody difficult for this old geezer's tongue, but it's still easier than learning the Russian stuff. Anyway, it's fun and I'm improving. Perhaps, more importantly, it supplies my brain with novelty that I hope will help keep it healthy as the years continue to mount.


 

I am not an audiophile, posted on January 6, 2017 at 08:34:45
Mike K
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I am a music lover, first and foremost, and a gear head secondarily.
The equipment exists to serve the needs of the music. The gear does
not need to be pretty or expensive or autiophool approved, it just needs
to make the music sound good.

As to why I am this way, I'd guess it's because music gives me pleasure,
and good equipment can increase my pleasure.

 

RE: That YouTube clip reminds me of Brian Eno's ambient albums, posted on January 6, 2017 at 08:42:47
mes
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yep. And maybe Patrick O'hearn

 

Pink Floyd effect on Disbliever, posted on January 6, 2017 at 10:15:26
hawkmoon
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This explains a lot.

 

Simple , really., posted on January 6, 2017 at 14:19:13
mark111
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I like music. A good set up lets me hear more of what's on the recording.
enjoy,
mark

 

Ego coming to grips with the sounds of music. -nt, posted on January 6, 2017 at 14:42:06
soulfood
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nt

 

RE: anticipation of reward, posted on January 6, 2017 at 16:21:16
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Yes, phonemes get more difficult as we lose our ability to perceive the higher frequencies, which mostly, in regards to language, affects our ability to distinguish consonants.

In Rachel's brain, assuming she was blind from birth, I would guess most of her visual cortex, as well as secondary areas in the parietal and temporal loves, is processing auditory information.

I've studied six languages in addition to my native language of English....at some point, when I was learning Chinese, my brain just felt "full." Finish is no picnic, but Chinese was over the top for me.

I really enjoy listening to music from German and Japan, both places I've lived for extended periods.

 

Audio Ergo Sum [nt], posted on January 6, 2017 at 19:10:09
steve.ott@kctcs.edu
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nt

 

RE: Why we are audiophiles...., posted on January 6, 2017 at 19:10:36
thump
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why listen to crappy sound quality if you don't have to and pretty good entry level gear can be had cheaply at that?

my entry into the audiophile ranks is a bit ironic. before i ever owned anything beyond the sound system i cobbled together out of an old gerard turntable i fabricated an unmeasured angled headshell for to replace the ceramic cartridghe, a simple in/out radioshack preamp, & a "toy" portable system i scavenged the amp (powered by the stripped motor/transformer) and 5 1/4" open back full range speakers from, i used to visit stereo shops whenever i was in the city.

after i bought a car stereo and boombox, i used to visit the FOUR closely spaced shops on the boulevard & ponder starting a system. i heard all kinds of gear including klipsch, but i was never blown away by anything until i heard a couple talking heads' albums on a buddy's B&O turntable & 50wpc denon receiver on a pair of $100 (!!!!) 4 1/2" sealed infinity reference 1000 speakers. i was amazed at both my first experience hearing pinpoint stereo imaging as well as lightning fast UNDISTORTED bass. i'd never heard drums thump so precisely. of course the bass was very light, but it wasn't sloppy & boomy sounding like most of the speakers being sold. it was the QUALITY that wowed me more than the quantity.

THAT's what set my tastes in gear in stone... little acoustic suspension minis that image like crazy and the smaller the better sealed subs. it would be later that i'd learn about dispersion, driver mass, resonances and air springs so i understood the science as to WHY i like what i do. (punchy dynamics and as little distortion as possible and porting creates distortion no matter how many bass reflex fans refuse to admit it DESPITE decades worth of established science & listener experience)

so, the irony is that i turned audiophile NOT because of exposure to $1,000+ systems, but a humble sub $500 entry level one that told MY EARS that anything beyond a sub sat system is just bogus marketing hype that in the case of ported speakers, sounds even worse than $100 minis.

that's why i'm an audiophile as well as why i always look for the best value and DESPISE that no one will make a $500 pair of "super duper superzeros" and that the mission & energy in particular minis i bought both had better drivers than my NHTs, but LOUSY USELESS RESONANT cabinets when you try to make the port resonance STFU. it's a conspiracy to sell bigger & more expensive speakers i say.

 

A.D.H.D., posted on January 7, 2017 at 06:22:09
jedrider
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Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

I figured that in the end, all I've been doing all my life is treating my condition. It's been fun, though.

 

I think you have been misunderstood., posted on January 7, 2017 at 07:27:20
wazoo
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To me, it sounds more Tangerine Dream than Pink Floyd, but the point is that it does work - the song is relaxing, quieting. I (and don't you cringe at what that pronoun implies) whipped myself into a cacophony of mental voices, arguing over the merits of the article, even though I already knew it to be true (one of the voices in the argument) - have been using music for that very purpose (and many others) for decades. Anyway, the voices gradually go silent while listening to 'Weightless'.

The thing is, however, that's part of actually attending to music - focusing attention. Then again, attention isn't the whole story, as you well know. Even when we aren't aware of mental chattering, it's nearly always happening. While driving to the office on Thursday, a name came to mind - the specifics are irrelevant, but the reason I was suddenly aware of it is that searching through the cobwebs of my memory had been a background process running since the previous day, and I laughed when I 'heard' it - I failed to recover it the day before via the alphabet method, because I stopped before 'Z'. The right music quiets the foreground and the background voices.

The lullaby may be our oldest musical form, beginning simply as soothing tones a mother discovered that reliably lulled her baby to sleep. I go to sleep with music every night. I have a carefully chosen and ordered series of songs that help dispatch me to dreamland. The Finnish song I learned this week is a lullaby - Nuku, Nuku (it's small and simple).

I think your point is a very strong one, but getting to it requires apprehending a different meaning of audiophile. Why are our brains so enamored with sounds arranged in a particular manner? What does exposure to music do to our brains (and don't you cringe over that possessive pronoun)? Ultimately, it all boils down to chemistry. Could oxytocin have something to do with our love of music/audio (arrangements of sound)?


 

RE: I think you have been misunderstood., posted on January 7, 2017 at 10:58:59
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Yes, oxytocin is in there as well. The research of Panksepp, using Pink Floyd, actually, has shown this.

I could have said "music lover" in place of "audiophile" and the message would have been the same....indeed, could have just said "human" insofar the effect that music has on the brain may be universal.

Some have suggested that our earliest music experience was in utero, listening to our mother's heartbeat. Probably some truth to that. There is also research showing that, in the last trimester, the developing fetus is sensitive to the auditory environment, including songs that the mother may sing while pregnant.

My guess is that many of us began walking down the road of audiophilia long before we even knew we were doing so.

 

And..., posted on January 7, 2017 at 11:21:04
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...what's even more amazing is the lengths we will go through to stimulate our brains with music...the technology (and sometimes money) we bring to bear on this issue is phenomenal.

 

RE: I think you have been misunderstood., posted on January 7, 2017 at 11:44:25
soulfood
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"I think your point is a very strong one, but getting to it requires apprehending a different meaning of audiophile."

Since it was posted in this forum, perhaps: Why we are inmates? Maybe that's just offering an unintentional perspective to the original poster.

 

And besides, as Devo used to say, "Are we not men?" [nt] ;-), posted on January 7, 2017 at 14:51:02
Chris from Lafayette
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No: We are Devo! ;-) (nt), posted on January 7, 2017 at 17:19:06
Steve O
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Joined: September 6, 2001

 

RE: somewhat of a meditation, posted on January 9, 2017 at 06:43:45
Tweaker456
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"sure you get high from it, is that bad really?" Well bullethead, if you apply your question to benzos then I would answer yes, it's bad really. Why have you gone over to the dark side? Thought you didn't like and or trust doctors. If the herbs didn't work there are other things like 5htp and tryptophan, or maybe you didn't take enough of the herbal products for a long enough time. T456
"The Borg is the ultimate user. They're unlike any threat your Federation has ever faced."

- Q, 2365

 

RE: Why we are audiophiles...., posted on January 9, 2017 at 15:02:48
michaelhigh
Audiophile

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Being an audiophile is the most recent stop in a journey for me.

At age 5 I saw The Beatles on Ed Sullivan and fell in love with rock and roll.

At age 9 I started playing music.

At age 12 I played my first pro gigs with my local junior philharmonic orchestra.

At age 16 I started playing rock music professionally.

In 2010 I started collecting stereo gear seriously after years of studying and performing music in various ways.

In 2017 I still perform and record music occasionally, but find that listening to music is much more enjoyable than physically participating, what with load in / load out, standing for extended periods of time, taking requests from drunks, etc.

That's why I'm an audiophile in 2017, at age 58.

 

RE: Why we are audiophiles...., posted on January 9, 2017 at 16:56:56
tamule
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"Information is not knowledge.
Knowledge is not wisdom.
Wisdom is not truth.
Truth is not beauty.
Beauty is not love.
Love is not music.
Music is THE BEST." Frank Zappa

 

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