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is there a superior WiFi booster/extender device?

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Posted on March 20, 2017 at 16:20:03
Mart
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Location: upstate NY
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I'd like it to help my my desktop PC, & Roku.

I can't move any devices.
... just my 2
moderate Mart

Planar Asylum

where speakers are thin & music isn't

 

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RE: is there a superior WiFi booster/extender device? , posted on March 20, 2017 at 18:48:36
standingstones
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Location: Pennsylvania
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You might try TP-Link power line extenders. I am using the AV1200 power line model. They seem to work well extending the signal to my garage.

 

RE: is there a superior WiFi booster/extender device? , posted on March 20, 2017 at 21:33:08
Mart
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Location: upstate NY
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I'm in a nursing home.

So, in your scenario, I'd need the device in your metaphorical garage.
... just my 2
moderate Mart

Planar Asylum

where speakers are thin & music isn't

 

RE: is there a superior WiFi booster/extender device? , posted on March 21, 2017 at 03:08:01
PAR
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The normal answer would simply be to replace the wi-fi router with a more powerful one. But I guess that your circumstances may not allow for this. Otherwise do that.

In regard to the recommendation for TPLink this uses the home power wiring to send the data signal matrixed with the power sine wave. Just what an audio enthusiast doesn't need as we all know distortion on the sine wave ( which is what it amounts to) has negative audible results on equipment connected to it. Perhaps you could buy a conditioner to clean it up for the outlets to your audio equipment but my experience has been that these add their own signature and I have returned to direct connection to the wall socket after a period of familiarisation.

 

RE: is there a superior WiFi booster/extender device? , posted on March 21, 2017 at 06:27:36
standingstones
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Your suggestion of buying a conditioner won't solve this person's wifi problem. I know the TP Link product works for a fact.

 

RE: is there a superior WiFi booster/extender device? , posted on March 21, 2017 at 06:59:40
PAR
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I hope that I may be able to clarify the point I was making.

I never said that buying a conditioner would solve the OP's wi-fi problem. Nor did I say that the TP link did not work for data transmission.

What I said was that TP Link adds what is essentially distortion to the mains sine wave. I said that this distortion has a negative effect on the performance of audio components that are connected to that mains circuit. I said that he could try a mains conditioner for his audio if he used the TP Link. The idea being that the conditioner could restore the sine wave - he would probably need a regenerator type for this.

 

RE: is there a superior WiFi booster/extender device? , posted on March 23, 2017 at 08:17:04
airtime
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I was under the impression that the TPlink sent a digital signal. How could that distort the audio signal?

I am new to learning about digital and was under the impression that a digital signal was a on/off type information and not a continuous wave

 

RE: is there a superior WiFi booster/extender device? , posted on March 23, 2017 at 08:46:09
PAR
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Any signal that is added to a sinewave ( e.g. matrixed or superimposed) is a form of distortion of the sinewave.

People often imagine that digital transmission works like a kind of morse code. In practice it is usually a continuous waveform having specific attributes which as they occur are interpreted by a detection circuit as representing a change in value ( + or -, 0 or 1, on or off). Digital engineering works by analogue means :-)

 

Interesting, posted on March 23, 2017 at 08:54:35
airtime
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Location: Arizona
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Do you have any links to some good information to learn more about this. I am trying to read up on it.

I'm using a TPLink to my Marantz NA7004 network streamer. Should I use something else???

 

RE: Interesting, posted on March 23, 2017 at 09:44:42
PAR
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The link attached leads to quite a good and simple Wikipedia article.

In respect of your other query I don't know exactly what you are doing and what it is that you link digitally to your streamer, what connections you use etc. Looking at the specifications I would guess that the usual connectivity would be via USB or ethernet but I see that SP/Dif co-ax and optical inputs also feature. Do you connect to a NAS or something similar?

If you are using TPlink for other types of digital distribution via the home mains wiring then the damage is done and plugging the network streamer into any wall socket will still mean using distorted power. However if the TPLink connection is only for this device then I would switch to a hard wired connection suitable to your needs and the device's connections. So ethernet cable is one way to go but I do know of people who say that using computer network optical cabling is better. However this adds a level of complexity and expense. Sticking with basic but decent quality Cat5 cabling if suitable you could then just try a connection with it against the TPLink and see what difference it makes - that would be a cheap comparison.

In any case I am sure that there will be better qualified inmates than myself able to deal with this.

 

RE: Interesting, posted on March 23, 2017 at 09:53:26
airtime
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Location: Arizona
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In my last house I did "hard wire" it with cat5. This house that I recently moved into, there is NO way I can get a cable from the router to the streaming device. So it has to be wireless.

The TPlink is used only for the streamer.

One odd thing about the NA7004. I tried patching the digital out from my NAD (Ok stop laughing) to the digtital coax in. Every connection with exception of my ipod I get "unable to unlock signal" error messages.

 

RE: Interesting, posted on March 23, 2017 at 11:21:58
PAR
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OK, no wires.

I am way outside of my comfort zone with this recommendation but if I understand the device it will connect to your router by wifi and to your network streamer's ethernet connector. At least that is how I see it.

Not sure about the other connectivity problems. At face value the Marantz can cope with a number of different types of digital input.

 

pointless., posted on March 25, 2017 at 09:44:38
bare
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Posts: 525
Joined: April 14, 2009
IF you can't hear a difference.. then Is it relevant?
Ideal is exactly that.
Real life is somewhat different.

 

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