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Selected New Releases This Week

45.83.136.7

Posted on June 14, 2024 at 02:03:25
Posts: 26925
Location: SF Bay Area
Joined: February 17, 2004
Contributor
  Since:
February 6, 2012
I use Apple Music for this purpose (their new releases come out on Fridays), and part of my selection process involves the album's availability in Dolby Atmos. I haven't heard any of them yet.


Two of Brahms's absolute greatest chamber works (and that's saying something!). My experience with the Gringolts Quartet in the past is that they were a bit too interventionist for my taste, but I'm hoping for the best with this release, and am looking forward to hearing it in Dolby Atmos. This recording is so new that it doesn't even seem to be listed on eClassical yet. (My current favorite recording of these two works is the 5Ch Audite recording, with the Cologne Chamber Players from the WDR SO, and I also have affection for the old 2Ch Bartok Quartet and friends recording on Hungaroton.)


I can never get enough recordings of these Prokofiev Cello works. I played the Symphony-Concerto in a workshop about 12 or so years ago - and it's got a killer cello part, but the work is perhaps a bit elusive on first listening. This recording also contains the Cello/Piano Sonata, which I've also played - it's a much more listener friendly type of piece. I heard one teacher claim that one of the movements depicts the bumbling nature of the Soviet Secret Police, but that sounds more like something which Shostakovich would do!


I don't know these works, and this recording is NOT available in Dolby Atmos. I just like what I've heard from Castelnuovo-Tedesco so far. I have a friend who, just last week, told me that, a long time ago, he asked Castelnuovo-Tedesco what one piece of advice he would give to a young composer just starting out. He replied that a potential composer should listen to as many things as possible and do something (i.e., get something down on paper) every day (back in the days when they used manuscript paper!). BTW, I read that Tchaikovsky gave some very similar advice - at least when it came to getting something down on paper every day. And I think Tchaikovsky said not to worry whether it's good or not - it can always be fixed/improved later! ;-)


Yet ANOTHER Rachmaninoff 3? Why not? I'm certainly willing to take a chance, especially since it's included in my subscription anyway. (I guess I missed Wei Luo's previous three releases - probably intended for the Chinese market.) I'm also interested in how well the Chinese are facing up to the challenges of Dolby Atmos.


Not too many Harmonia Mundi titles in Dolby Atmos yet, so I'm interested in this new one. The repertoire consists of Mahler, Korngold and Berg. This is another artist with previous releases which I've managed to miss.

I probably won't be able to listen to any of these titles until after the cello recital I'm accompanying on Sunday.

 

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RE: Selected New Releases This Week, posted on June 16, 2024 at 09:18:12
Mali
Audiophile

Posts: 2272
Location: Wyoming
Joined: June 12, 2003
Contributor
  Since:
November 11, 2009
Been listening to the Brahms string quintets and sextets recently on older Hyperion recordings. Just wonderful stuff.

 

Yes! I used to have that Hyperion recording of the Sextets, posted on June 16, 2024 at 11:18:16
Posts: 26925
Location: SF Bay Area
Joined: February 17, 2004
Contributor
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. . . with the Raphael Ensemble. I even gave a copy as a gift one time, I was so enthusiastic about it!


I had the original incarnation, rather than this one.

 

RE: Yes! I used to have that Hyperion recording of the Sextets, posted on June 16, 2024 at 13:03:08
pbarach
Audiophile

Posts: 3351
Location: Ohio
Joined: June 22, 2008
The Alexander String Quartet (and associates) produced a wonderful set of the Brahms string quintets and sextets for their label Foghorn, and in fine stereo (sorry, Chris!).

I "learned" the first sextet from sitting in while Mischa Schneider coached some excellent students in the piece. Then I got the 1952 recording with Stern, (A.) Schneider, Casals et al. Still may favorite recording, but the sound is dim: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EymEs1x6c4Q

 

1952 recording, posted on June 16, 2024 at 14:34:00
Kal Rubinson
Reviewer

Posts: 12489
Location: New York
Joined: June 5, 2002
I discovered the sextets (actually only the first one) when I saw the Jeanne Moreau film, The Lovers, in 1958. It was a slow film but the central love scene was accompanied by the most heavenly (and heavingly) passionate music that had ever heard. I eagerly waited for the credits to find that it was, indeed, the Andante from the first sextet from this very Casals Festival recording.

Of course, I bought it but, after a few years I searched for a more modern recording. None were as satisfying and were rejected until I figured out that what made the this recording uniquely intimate and personal was the accompaniment of Casals' quiet humming. Then I was able to move on but, regardless of the humming, this recording remains unique.

 

"The Lovers", posted on June 17, 2024 at 11:31:18
pbarach
Audiophile

Posts: 3351
Location: Ohio
Joined: June 22, 2008
The Louis Malle film "The Lovers" was the subject of a famous First Amendment case about alleged obscenity that ended in a Supreme Court verdict ("I know it when I see it") favorable to the theater owner. The theater, which used to show "art" (i.e., foreign) movies, is now a Christian church.

A couple of months ago, someone rented the theater for a lecture recital on the Goldberg Variations.

 

That came from Ohio., posted on June 17, 2024 at 12:12:56
Kal Rubinson
Reviewer

Posts: 12489
Location: New York
Joined: June 5, 2002
We saw it in NY in 1959.

 

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