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Tweaks for systems, rooms and Do It Yourself (DIY) help. FAQ.

Let's assume that I made up the whole thing...

Why would I do that? I admit that my a priori bias and everyone else's bias was that we would hear no difference with the boutique fuse, as the circuit is not in the signal path. So why would I make it up? I mention it because it is an interesting result, for other audiophiles and tweakers. It should be especially interesting to those who are slaves to expensive tweaks.

Some many years ago, I did an experiment with power cords on my ESL speakers. My bias going in to that experiment was that power cords on an ESL bias supply should not be audible. I borrowed a few different AC cords from a dealer friend and one from an audiophile friend. To those I added the AC cord supplied by the manufacturer (Sound Lab) and a heavy gauge hardware store cord. I think I had about six different power cords, in total. To my surprise, you CAN hear the power cord on an ESL, and there were 2 out of 6 that sounded best to my ears: one was a ribbon-type (Mapleshade) and the other was the hardware store cord. There wasn't much difference between those two, but they both seemed to outperform the other aftermarket cords, one of which was truly bad sounding, as I recall. So, being an anal audiophile, I bought the Mapleshade instead of taking the cheaper route of using the hardware store cord.

Both experiences tell me that you have to try these devices in your own system with your own ears. Results can be surprising and not proportional to cost.


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  Kimber Kable  


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