Home DVD-Audiobahn

New DVD-Audio music releases and talk about the latest players.

That's pretty standard practice

Typical popular music recordings are made in three distinct processes:

1) The raw recordings are made to a multi-track storage unit. The sound is tailored by the selection of microphones and the acoustic properties of the recording venue. There may be some signal processing applied at this stage (EQ, compression, etc.), but this is typically minimal.

2) The multi-track master recording is mixed down to stereo. At this stage, many effects (EQ, compression, reverb, etc.) are added to each track to achieve the desired final product.

3) The final stereo mix is "mastered" to the chosen format (CD, LP, et cetera). There may be some minor overall adjustments, such as levels, compression, and EQ, but these are typically done to tailor the stereo master to the limitations of the chosen format.

These three steps are typically performed in different facilities by different engineers. So what you have described is not at all unusual. Apparently the mastering engineer uses one of the Pacific Microsonic A/D converters (either the Model One or the Model Two), so all discs mastered by him will illuminate the HDCD light on playback (regardless of whether or not they will benefit from HDCD decoding, which depends on what settings the mastering engineer chose to use).


This post is made possible by the generous support of people like you and our sponsors:
  A/V Solutions  


Follow Ups Full Thread
Follow Ups
  • That's pretty standard practice - Charles Hansen 22:59:57 12/31/05 (0)


You can not post to an archived thread.