Hi-Rez Highway

New high resolution SACD releases, players and technology.

Return to Hi-Rez Highway


Message Sort: Post Order or Asylum Reverse Threaded

hi-res lp digitizer

73.15.61.66

Posted on October 15, 2016 at 13:07:56
kenzo
Audiophile

Posts: 692
Location: San Francisco
Joined: September 27, 2003
under $100?

anyone have experience with one?

don't need phone preamp/riaa eq.

need rca inputs on the device.

and preferably 24x194 sampling or even DSD?

thanks,
ken

 

Hide full thread outline!
    ...
RE: hi-res lp digitizer, posted on October 15, 2016 at 17:28:43
John Elison
Audiophile

Posts: 20423
Location: Central Kentucky
Joined: December 20, 2000
Contributor
  Since:
January 29, 2004
Add another zero to your budget and the following digitizer will blow you away. I now copy all my LPs to DSD 5.6-MHz.

 

RE: hi-res lp digitizer, posted on October 15, 2016 at 17:29:07
PAR
Audiophile

Posts: 1917
Location: South London
Joined: April 15, 2013
Contributor
  Since:
January 12, 2014
If you don't need RIAA then you just need an ADC. But under $100 for 24/192 (not 194) conversion + DSD for <$100? Doubtful. You might get 24/96 but the qualitative level of performance in a high end context I suspect would be arguable.

 

Pure Vinyl. nt, posted on October 15, 2016 at 18:15:53
G Squared
Audiophile

Posts: 3897
Location: Washington, DC Metro Area
Joined: November 16, 2004
.

 

24/96 maybe, posted on October 16, 2016 at 05:05:25
rrob
Audiophile

Posts: 729
Location: Kansas
Joined: February 7, 2010
Contributor
  Since:
February 7, 2010
I've not seen any devices capable of DSD or even 24/192 for under $100. Are you convinced you need that degree of resolution?

Several years ago I started recording lps with a now discontinued Tascam US 322. You can still find it on Amazon for just over $100. It records at 24/96. I have since purchased a DA-3000 but still record at 24/96. I tried 24/192 and DSD but didn't find the differences convincing. YMMV

 

RE: Pure Vinyl. nt, posted on October 16, 2016 at 09:59:46
PAR
Audiophile

Posts: 1917
Location: South London
Joined: April 15, 2013
Contributor
  Since:
January 12, 2014
Not really suitable for the OP. Pure Vinyl costs a lot more than $100 and you still need an ADC.

 

RE: 24/96 maybe, posted on October 17, 2016 at 08:35:30
John Elison
Audiophile

Posts: 20423
Location: Central Kentucky
Joined: December 20, 2000
Contributor
  Since:
January 29, 2004
Have you tried DSD 5.6-MHz? Personally, I think it is the best sounding format I've ever heard. I used to use an Alesis Masterlink to record my vinyl at 24/96 and I thought it was perfect. However, after buying my TASCAM DA-3000 and making some DSD 5.6-MHz recordings, I feel like they are even more perfect if that's possible. ;-) Anyway, I kind of fell in love with DSD 5.6-MHz and since storage memory is cheap nowadays, I've decided to make all future recordings of vinyl at DSD 5.6-MHz. Perhaps it's really not any better than 24/96, but it's fun to do and it sounds better to me.

Incidentally, I really like my DA-3000. I also use it as an autonomous digital player by plugging in USB flash drives to its front panel USB port. I have a lot of commercial hi-res digital including DSD 2.8-MHz and the DA-3000 seems to have one of the best sounding DACs I've ever heard.

How do you like your DA-3000?

Best regards,
John Elison

 

RE: 24/96 maybe, posted on October 17, 2016 at 12:03:39
rrob
Audiophile

Posts: 729
Location: Kansas
Joined: February 7, 2010
Contributor
  Since:
February 7, 2010
I recorded multiple LPs at DSD 5.6 MHz. They sound fine, but to me, not much different than 24/96. I have software that allows me to load two versions of the same song, select the same small section of each and quickly switch back and forth between them. It's easy to spot differences. Given my experience (and my ears), I'd rather have smaller files and twice as many.

The DA 3000 is a very nice recorder and big improvement over the US 322. I still buy mostly LPs but most of my listening is from the recordings I make.

 

RE: hi-res lp digitizer, posted on October 17, 2016 at 14:03:30
AbeCollins
Audiophile

Posts: 27688
Location: USA
Joined: June 22, 2001
Contributor
  Since:
February 2, 2002
You did say under $100.

$30 USB Audio Interface, but limited to 48KHz


My HRT Linestreamer+. $300, good to 24/96KHz and sounds great!


Ripping vinyl to 24/96Hz AIFF audio files


Using free Audacity software for Mac or PC


Playing with a borrowed $1000 PS Audio NuWave Phono Converter




 

Ditto for the Linestreamer, posted on October 18, 2016 at 08:10:29
E-Stat
Audiophile

Posts: 23787
Joined: May 12, 2000
Contributor
  Since:
April 5, 2002
for which there is now an updated "+" version.

I use free version of Audacity with mine.

 

RE: 24/96 maybe, posted on October 18, 2016 at 18:00:48
John Elison
Audiophile

Posts: 20423
Location: Central Kentucky
Joined: December 20, 2000
Contributor
  Since:
January 29, 2004
> I still buy mostly LPs but most of my listening is from the recordings I make.

Me, too! I prefer to listen to vinyl via the recordings I make. They sound just as good as the real thing and digital is so much more convenient.

Best regards,
John Elison

 

Great device at a decent price, posted on October 19, 2016 at 16:33:24
AbeCollins
Audiophile

Posts: 27688
Location: USA
Joined: June 22, 2001
Contributor
  Since:
February 2, 2002

I have the HRT Linestreamer+ version that had an MSRP of $349 a couple years ago. I saw it for $299 a couple months ago by one of the popular online retailers. It may have been on sale or a 'photo shoot' demo. I can't remember if it was Music-Direct, Acoustic Sounds, Audio Advisor, or another.

The PS Audio NuWave Phono Converter was $1899 a couple years ago and they recently dropped the price to $999.. In addition to having a good A/D converter, it includes a nice built-in phono preamp. I already own a phono preamp. The PS Audio is a nice unit at $999 (a bit pricey at the old $1899 price IMHO). However, there was no discernible difference that I could hear in 24/96 PCM music files produced from the PS Audio vs my $300 HRT Linestreamer+.




 

24/96 to ? disc., posted on October 22, 2016 at 11:09:20
hifitommy
Audiophile

Posts: 13667
Location: shaky sylmar calif, orig from buffalo ny
Joined: June 9, 2000
john,

if you record at hi rez, can you put that onto a disc in hi rez that is playable on a universal player?
...regards...tr

 

RE: 24/96 to ? disc., posted on October 22, 2016 at 11:37:43
John Elison
Audiophile

Posts: 20423
Location: Central Kentucky
Joined: December 20, 2000
Contributor
  Since:
January 29, 2004
> If you record at hi rez, can you put that onto a disc in hi rez that is playable on a universal player?

I don't know. I've always played hi-res from a hard drive or a flash drive. I used to use my computer with Foobar2000 software to stream hi-res from its USB port to a DAC with a USB input, but nowadays my Oppo BDP-105D accepts USB hard drives and flash drives directly. My TASCAM DA-3000 also accepts up to a 64GB USB flash drive into it front panel USB port for playing hi-res up to and including DSD 5.6M.

There is something called DVD Audio that I've heard about but never used. I believe it contains 24/96 digital on a disc that can be played in DVD Audio players. I really don't know much about DVD Audio, though.

My old Alesis Masterlink could put 24/96 digital onto a regular CD-R, but it was playable only in another Masterlink. However, that was the only way to get my recordings off the Masterlink's hard drive and into my computer. It was a pain in the ass and I went through a lot of CD-Rs because they could hold only about 21-minutes of music. Consequently, I really like my TASCAM DA-3000, which uses removable 32GB SDHC memory cards for transporting my recordings to my computer for mastering.

Best regards,
John Elison

 

Maximum SD card size for DA-3000?, posted on October 23, 2016 at 14:50:20
Rushton
Audiophile

Posts: 618
Location: Richmond, VA
Joined: January 5, 2001
John, does 32GB continue to be the maximum SD card size for the DA-3000? Just wondering if a firmware update somewhere along the way may have changed the maximum capacity limitation.

 

RE: Maximum SD card size for DA-3000?, posted on October 23, 2016 at 16:04:30
John Elison
Audiophile

Posts: 20423
Location: Central Kentucky
Joined: December 20, 2000
Contributor
  Since:
January 29, 2004
I think 32GB is the largest SD card you can use. Is there some reason you need more continuous memory? A 32GB SD card provides over 6-hours of continuous recording time at the TASCAM's highest resolution of DSD(128). When it's full, you can simply remove it and install an empty memory card. What were you planning to do that required more continuous memory? If you need more, the TASCAM can use up to a 64GB CF memory card for recording. Again, all memory cards are removable so you can simply install fresh memory cards when you fill up the ones you're using.

Good luck,
John Elison

 

RE: Maximum SD card size for DA-3000?, posted on October 23, 2016 at 16:36:17
Rushton
Audiophile

Posts: 618
Location: Richmond, VA
Joined: January 5, 2001
Thanks, John. Just wondering before I purchase a couple of cards to swap in and out. I've got a DA-3000 headed my way and am gathering the complement of ancillary materials I'll need for digitizing my vinyl over time.

I appreciate all of the information you've shared at AA about your experiences with the DA-3000.

 

RE: Maximum SD card size for DA-3000?, posted on October 23, 2016 at 17:36:45
rrob
Audiophile

Posts: 729
Location: Kansas
Joined: February 7, 2010
Contributor
  Since:
February 7, 2010
On the Tascam site there is a list of recommended SD and CF sizes and brands for the DA-3000. I'm using 133x 8 and 32 GB CF cards from Transcend. Also have a USB 3.0 reader to transfer to hard drives

I bought my DA 3000 in March of 2014. It continues to work flawlessly.

 

Thank you /nt, posted on October 23, 2016 at 17:43:19
Rushton
Audiophile

Posts: 618
Location: Richmond, VA
Joined: January 5, 2001
nt

 

RE: Maximum SD card size for DA-3000?, posted on October 23, 2016 at 19:53:45
John Elison
Audiophile

Posts: 20423
Location: Central Kentucky
Joined: December 20, 2000
Contributor
  Since:
January 29, 2004
Congratulations on your purchase! I'm sure you will really like the DA-3000.

I bought two 32GB SDHC memory cards to start with and I've used only one. The second one is still in its package.

I normally record several LPs in succession and then remove the SDHC card to transfer the raw recordings to my computer for mastering. I use TASCAM Hi-Res Editor software to master my recordings, which means cropping and splitting into individual tracks and labeling each track accordingly. When I insert the SDHC card back into the DA-3000 I reformat it.

On one day-long recording session I actually filled the entire 32GB memory card. I think I recorded 10 or 12 classical Lps to DSD(128). However, I've yet to even use my second SDHC card.

Good luck,
John Elison

 

RE: Maximum SD card size for DA-3000?, posted on October 23, 2016 at 20:19:59
Rushton
Audiophile

Posts: 618
Location: Richmond, VA
Joined: January 5, 2001
John, thanks for the additional information. I will be following a very similar process to yours. I still have to figure out what disk storage I'll set up. So, more research to do on that.

I can't find a working link on the Tascam site to download the Hi-Res Editor software. I've found the page, but the link will not launch a download. I guest it's because I use Windows 10, not listed as supported. Any suggestions?

 

RE: Maximum SD card size for DA-3000?, posted on October 23, 2016 at 20:35:25
John Elison
Audiophile

Posts: 20423
Location: Central Kentucky
Joined: December 20, 2000
Contributor
  Since:
January 29, 2004
I use Windows 10 and it works just fine. I can't remember if I had Windows 10 a year ago when I downloaded it, though.

Maybe their link is down. Try it tomorrow. The zipped file is 31.1-GB so it's probably too large to attach to email and send to you. However, I would do that if it were possible. Maybe the download link will work later.

Good luck,
John Elison

 

Thanks - will keep checking the link /nt, posted on October 23, 2016 at 20:43:50
Rushton
Audiophile

Posts: 618
Location: Richmond, VA
Joined: January 5, 2001
/nt

 

RE: Thanks - will keep checking the link /nt, posted on October 23, 2016 at 20:50:01
John Elison
Audiophile

Posts: 20423
Location: Central Kentucky
Joined: December 20, 2000
Contributor
  Since:
January 29, 2004
Actually, I meant 31.1-MB. Is that too large to attach to an email?

 

RE: Thanks - will keep checking the link, posted on October 23, 2016 at 21:17:31
Rushton
Audiophile

Posts: 618
Location: Richmond, VA
Joined: January 5, 2001
Hmmm, I know my incoming server will accept 20MB, but I don't know about 30. I can open up a shared folder in my Dropbox account for you if you send your email address to me via my profile. That way you could upload to it and I can then pull it down. Would that work for you?

Greatly appreciate your willingness to help!

 

RE: Thanks - will keep checking the link, posted on October 23, 2016 at 21:26:23
John Elison
Audiophile

Posts: 20423
Location: Central Kentucky
Joined: December 20, 2000
Contributor
  Since:
January 29, 2004
Just click on my name and you will see my email address.

Thanks,
John Elison

 

RE: hi-res lp digitizer, posted on November 28, 2016 at 01:45:58
Ogh
Audiophile

Posts: 17
Location: Oslo
Joined: November 5, 2004
Some more experience: I have used the DA-3000 for three years, recording some hundred LPs. It works fine. I also use it for playback, from a Seagate Wireless+ 2TB disk. I agree that dual speed DSD is the way to go with this recorder. Clearly the best sound. Although playing LPs "direct" still has an edge, it is very close (using a Lyra Atlas/SME V/Hanss T30 player).

 

RE: hi-res lp digitizer, posted on December 21, 2016 at 10:04:17
Ogh
Audiophile

Posts: 17
Location: Oslo
Joined: November 5, 2004
I agree with most comments regarding the DA-3000. Like I said, double DSD sounds best, and I see no reason to record from vinyl using a sub-optimal format. Input cables (good XLR) and everything else upstream up to the cartridge also play a role. I think it likes a good power cord and a bit of damping at the top. Good feet/shelf. Some power cleaning seems good also - I have not experimented much.

Even if I cannot record directly to the USB disk, it is easy to copy over from a card. I find the USB connection very useful, since it means that the Tascam can be used as a standalone DSD player with a huge library of files. My Wireless 2 TB disk does the job well, except that it loses contact with the Tascam now and then. Turning the Tascam off and back on (and, sometimes, press the button on the disk) gets in back in shape.

The recordings are so good that they almost replace my vinyl records. I did a calculation, and found that, with an expensive cartridge and riaa, the probable cost of playing an hour of recorded vinyl versus an hour of vinyl direct is in the region of 1/10 to 1/20. Assuming that repair costs are reasonable for the Tascam. So in a way, I am sad that I still turn to my turntable to get the very best playback.

It may be that some of the shortcomings I hear, on the recordings, are due to the Tascam's D-A conversion. That would add to future value, I could get a better DAC later on. The most important thing, for now, would probably be to improve the A-D conversion, since this is what will be "forever recorded". But I have not seen anyone doing that modification.

 

Page processed in 0.034 seconds.