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cryo

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Posted on May 19, 2012 at 23:52:49
mike1127
Dealer

Posts: 290
Joined: June 3, 2009
Can I send any cables and vacuum tubes to be cryo'd? Do I need to find a company that will do small batches at a reasonable price? Are there components that should *not* be cryo'd? Like what about potentiometers and switches? How about capacitors, inductors, and transformers? Resisters? How about sending an entire tube amp to be cryo'd? How about headphones?

Mike

 

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RE: cryo, posted on May 20, 2012 at 00:20:57
Charles Hansen
Manufacturer

Posts: 6032
Joined: August 1, 2001
Cryo companies generally charge by the pound. There is a national chain called "300 Below" that mostly does industrial stuff. There are a couple of places that cater to the audio market (assuming they are still in business). I have heard that it is bad to cryo electrolytic capacitors. Everything else is pretty much fair game. I have heard of people sending complete tube amps through (presumably less the electrolytic caps) but that would be quite expensive given the weight of the transformers. Never heard of anyone doing headphones. Detachable cables would be no problem, but I don't know about the rest of the 'phones -- headband, earpads, et cetera. You could always start with a cheap set as an experiment. Have fun!

 

I have asked about Cryoing stuff. Best to do cables and wires. Some have done whole amps, posted on May 20, 2012 at 00:22:47
Many cryo places say they will NOT do tubes, and they may self destruct. Though others say cryoed tubes are worth the effort to get done.
Finding a place is the next problem. Various folks may have experience with one or another.

Then of course, what if you cryo a very expensive item and you then do not like it. that is the big reason i would hesitate to do a major component.

 

RE: cryo, posted on May 20, 2012 at 06:00:51
May Belt
Manufacturer

Posts: 675
Location: Leeds UK
Joined: March 16, 2005
Whilst you are deciding and whilst you are trying to find a company to do the full cryogenic freezing treatment for you, why donít you try some simple Ďtreatmentsí of your own using your own deep freezer ?

Start with two identical CDs, treating one and keeping one untreated as the control. We were quite lucky in the UK during the early 1990 because a few of the Hi Fi magazines would have a free CD attached to their front cover Ė so we were able to obtain identical CD copies quite cheaply. If you donít have two identical CDs, then usually people have a CD somewhere where they have been disappointed by itís sound ever since they bought it. Dig it out if you have one, listen to it to confirm that you still donít like itís sound, then place it in a plain plastic bag and place it in your deep freezer. Usually 24 hours freezing is ample time. However, when you lift it out to defrost, the secret is to allow it to return to room temperature very, very slowly Ė usually by placing it in a towel or blanket.

If you find you have success with a now better sounding CD, then try the same freezing/slow defrost technique with an interconnect and then with an AC power cord !!

Regards,
May Belt,
Manufacturer.

 

RE: cryo, posted on May 20, 2012 at 08:23:47
barryb
Audiophile

Posts: 1778
Joined: December 28, 2011
I've had good success with tubes -- done lots of them. Cable benefits vary. Most copper cables benefit. Silver does not seem to benefit. Do not cryo LPs, they will be destroyed.

Razor blades benefit enourmously
golf balls become harder and more durable

I've had good results with copper cables, individual parts, tubes, AC outlets.


CryoInternational in AZ is the place to use. $9/lb, 8 lb min or so.

 

I'm currently using your "cryo" method., posted on May 20, 2012 at 09:11:52
tweakk
Audiophile

Posts: 807
Joined: October 3, 2009
On my mother in law.

The process is ongoing but so far so good...

 

RE: I'm currently using your "cryo" method., posted on May 20, 2012 at 12:03:30
The Heretic


 
AH! A worthy endeavor!

 

Oh no, posted on May 20, 2012 at 12:12:10
mes
Audiophile

Posts: 688
Joined: August 7, 2001
Contributor
  Since:
September 4, 2003
Now you'll be able to hear her more clearly. Yer doomed

 

I suppose you'll like her better one way or the other when done?...N/T, posted on May 20, 2012 at 12:39:56
musetap
Audiophile

Posts: 13417
Location: San Francisco
Joined: July 8, 2003
Contributor
  Since:
January 28, 2004
N/T
"Once this was all Black Plasma and Imagination" - Michael McClure



 

Lots of great cryo info..., posted on May 20, 2012 at 12:45:30
musetap
Audiophile

Posts: 13417
Location: San Francisco
Joined: July 8, 2003
Contributor
  Since:
January 28, 2004
N/T
"Once this was all Black Plasma and Imagination" - Michael McClure



 

Not really interested in results., posted on May 20, 2012 at 12:50:32
tweakk
Audiophile

Posts: 807
Joined: October 3, 2009
I think I'll just let her "cryo" for a while.

 

Cool! Enjoy the process!...N/T, posted on May 20, 2012 at 12:54:54
musetap
Audiophile

Posts: 13417
Location: San Francisco
Joined: July 8, 2003
Contributor
  Since:
January 28, 2004
N/T
"Once this was all Black Plasma and Imagination" - Michael McClure



 

There is no problem with electrolytics....., posted on May 20, 2012 at 14:49:56
alan m. kafton
Manufacturer

Posts: 4537
Joined: April 7, 2000
I've been treating them for over 12 years without incident, along with fully populated circuit boards, as has the facility I use (Cryogenics International).

 

in your experience..., posted on May 22, 2012 at 22:27:20
mike1127
Dealer

Posts: 290
Joined: June 3, 2009
... is it safe to cryo tubes? do they need special handling or techniques?

 

RE: in your experience..., posted on May 23, 2012 at 13:04:28
alan m. kafton
Manufacturer

Posts: 4537
Joined: April 7, 2000
Completely safe, with two caveats.

Firstly, know that there are different cryogenic processes performed by differing companies, both as to the control method of ramp-down and ramp-up of temperature, and to the depth of temperature.

While I vastly prefer using a facility that treats materials at -320F (the sonic results are superior, imo), a facility that only went down to -295F or -300F would be acceptable as long as their ramp-down and ramp-up control was tight and extended (meaning very long and gradual). This ensures the materials will not be shocked by any rapid fluctuation of temperature.

Secondly, and especially on older NOS tubes, there is no guarantee that the vacuum seal on these tubes is perfect (and dependent on the adhesive used, if any), and therefore there could be a failure. It's not happened to me in the 12+ years of my experience, but it's always a possibility. This is not the fault of the cryogenic facility, but the fault of the original manufacturer. Just something to be aware of....

 

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